Rod Steiger (Napoleon in Waterloo) Turned Down the Role of Patton

May 2018
809
Michigan
#1
Came across an article which indicates that Rod Steiger turned down the role of Patton for the iconic 1970 American film, Patton. Since Waterloo also came out in 1970, it is difficult to know if Steiger would have been able to star in both Waterloo and Patton, but if anyone could challenge the performance of George C. Scott as Patton, it would be the man who gave such a convincing delivery of lines from "I will NOT!!!" (in response to his marshals urging his abdication) to musing in quasi-split screen cuts with Christopher Plummer's Wellington, "Where is Grouchy?"
 
Jul 2016
9,679
USA
#2
The real Patton had a high pitched voice, a pronounced Virginian accent bordering on a lisp. Scott's voice was far too gravelly and deep. Though I'm sure the real Patton would have loved to have been portrayed in such a way by such an actor.
 
May 2018
809
Michigan
#4
The real Patton had a high pitched voice, a pronounced Virginian accent bordering on a lisp. Scott's voice was far too gravelly and deep. Though I'm sure the real Patton would have loved to have been portrayed in such a way by such an actor.
Yes, George Patton is another example of a racist Virginian whose legend has exponentially grown since his death (I'm looking at you, General Lee), far beyond reality.
 
Mar 2019
1,626
Kansas
#8
very good for accuracy, however, "Waterloo" has that epic scale which is only now attempted using CGI.
Both films found ways to get vast numbers of extras virtually for free. Once you do that you can afford to spend the money on research and getting your story as accurate as possible
 
Dec 2011
4,866
Iowa USA
#9
Both films found ways to get vast numbers of extras virtually for free. Once you do that you can afford to spend the money on research and getting your story as accurate as possible
I certainly won't contradict you that vast numbers of extras appear in "Gettysburg". ;)
 
May 2018
809
Michigan
#10
I thought he had good things to say about black combat troops.
I don't mean the term "racist" in the way a Social Justice Warrior might mean it: a caricatured cliche straight out of Mississippi Burning. Patton did make some vary racially insensitive comments, but that was largely a combination of his character and the fact he came from a privileged Virginia family around the turn of the century. However, it seems that when things really mattered, he was relatively "colorblind." Probably one of the few instances where saying one thing and doing another can be construed as a positive thing.

"Men, you're the first Negro tankers to ever fight in the American Army. I would never have asked for you if you weren't good. I have nothing but the best in my Army. I don't care what color you are as long as you go up there and kill those Kraut sonsofbitches. Everyone has their eyes on you and is expecting great things from you. Most of all your race is looking forward to your success. Don't let them down and damn you, don't let me down! They say it is patriotic to die for your country. Well, let’s see how many patriots we can make out of those German sonsofbitches. "

-Patton
 

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