Roman red baked brick construction and Indian connection

Aug 2014
4,679
Australia
#12
i think you are confusing mud brick with fired bricks
I'm not confusing anything; I've been relying on peer-reviewed archaeological reports, so maybe the archaeologists are confused. Here is one of the Sumerian bricks - the British Museum has 47 of them. The BM curators seem to think that it is made of fired clay. Perhaps they are confused as well.
British Musem - Sumerian brick

 
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Oct 2013
14,533
Europix
#14
The only time the temperature is important is if a glaze is applied. The brick itself doesn't even need a kiln. The temperature of a regular camp fire is more than sufficient to fire a brick.
Actually, a very simple and effective method is to build the kiln itself out of the bricks one wants to fire. It's a method used by people making their own houses with self-made fire bricks.

I've personally had seen the method still used (in Europe) just a couple of decades ago.
 
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Aug 2014
4,679
Australia
#15
i think that video is wrong that must be a fired brick not baked brick, i thought baked bricks used higher temperatures.
"Fired" doesn't mean "burnt". "Firing" is a specific term used to describe the process in which clay turns into ceramic under heat. For terracotta, that temperature is achievable in a camp fire.

Baked clay is done at a lower temperature than fired clay. With the former, the clay is heated enough to drive out the water, but not enough to convert it to ceramic. Leaving it in the sun for a few days is usually sufficient.
 
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Edratman

Forum Staff
Feb 2009
6,691
Eastern PA
#16
Not really. They didn't cost anything, they were just messages advising me that the phone was now connected to a roaming network.
i think that video is wrong that must be a fired brick not mud brick, i thought baked bricks used higher temperatures.

regards
The time-temperature range and relationship for successful brick making is quite wide. The type of clay, the clay/sand ration and desired physical properties of the finished brick all influence the "optimal" temperature.

Adequate bricks, can be produced simply by sun drying (adobe). Using an oven/kiln enhances the hardness and water resistance depending on time and temperature.

The basic principles of ceramics can be initiated around a cooking fire. It requires a little "smarts" to extrapolate the basics to construction products, but it is not rocket surgery.
 
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Oct 2013
14,533
Europix
#17
The time-temperature range and relationship for successful brick making is quite wide. The type of clay, the clay/sand ration and desired physical properties of the finished brick all influence the "optimal" temperature.

Adequate bricks, can be produced simply by sun drying (adobe). Using an oven/kiln enhances the hardness and water resistance depending on time and temperature.

The basic principles of ceramics can be initiated around a cooking fire. It requires a little "smarts" to extrapolate the basics to construction products, but it is not rocket surgery.
I will just add a small detail: as "old ones" hadn't had a total control on temperature and uniformity of exposure to temperature (thus differences in the hardness of bricks in the same lot), they used the different bricks for different purposes/places: the best/the hardest bricks where used in arches, the less hard in "filling", the failed were splinted and used in mortar, for example.
 
Oct 2013
14,533
Europix
#18
I was mentioning that making baked bricks doesnn't necesarilly need a kiln, as the bricks-to-be-backed are forming the kiln itself. I found a couple of images in today's Uganda, using that old technique:

A small kiln made of the dried bricks:




A bigger kiln. You can see the mud on the exterior, used for "closing the gaps", thus keeping the heat.

 
Oct 2013
14,533
Europix
#19
if its so, why it was not being done by the greeks, in the middle east etc, why were they using mud bricks?

regards
Very often, the technology is used only if it's useful. Or if You prefer, technological advance appears when is needed.

Backed brick is time and resources consuming: You need not only the appropriate clay, but also wood for the fire. And wood is far from being extremely abundant in places like Mideast or Greece, so it's more important to use it in a more efficient way that burn it for making bricks.

The other aspect is that in a hotter climate, backed brick is worse than mud: one prefers a colder house, and that's the mud one, not the backed brick one. If You look closer, You will see that mud constructions can be very resistant, can be very elaborated, much more than our modern disregard towards it might suggest.

For more important construction, it's evident: stone. Sometimes harder to work with (depends on what stone is used) but again, You skip the chapter "kiln".
 
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