Romans invented Cricket!

Feb 2011
942
Scotland
#31
Incidentally the Aurelian left-arm round the wicket, might be a reference to a famous bowling action controversy, from which baseball may have evolved. The infamous spear arm 'throw' scandal that no doubt rocked the 3rd century, from which it never recovered!
The crisis of the third century, as it is known! Was it a throw- or a roundarm delivery?
 
Feb 2017
180
Devon, UK
#37
Actually I think you'll find that, as with most things supposedly Roman, it's origins are actually Greek. Recent research has provided conclusive evidence that the Venus de Milo originally depicted the Godess in the act of playing a forward defensive stroke. Then there's Titian's Renaissance depiction of Bacchus as a right arm seamer (based on a now lost sculpture). Titian | Bacchus and Ariadne | NG35 | National Gallery, London
 
Sep 2015
1,602
England
#38
Actually I think you'll find that, as with most things supposedly Roman, it's origins are actually Greek. Recent research has provided conclusive evidence that the Venus de Milo originally depicted the Godess in the act of playing a forward defensive stroke. Then there's Titian's Renaissance depiction of Bacchus as a right arm seamer (based on a now lost sculpture). Titian | Bacchus and Ariadne | NG35 | National Gallery, London
With ref to the Venus, it looks like a cover drive to me ! look at the footwork!
 
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Sep 2015
1,602
England
#39
Some outstanding Test rivalries back in those days, Rome-Carthage was an absolute scorcher.
Carthage would have played the MCC of course not Rome: Magistrates Cricket Club, perhaps, there are not direct sources that can fully attest to this interpretation.

The MCC may also have been formed to fly the flag around the Empire, in reaction to the earlier Cato Cricket Club! Details of the latters disappearance are still shrouded in mystery and darkness to this day!
 
Jan 2014
2,292
Westmorland
#40
Shame about the Britannia Secunda team; although it recovered after the Barbarian Conspiracy, the withdrawal of the test team by Constantine III in his quest to set up a triangular tournament with Honorius and Alaric's Goths proved the final straw for Roman Britain.
Sadly true. The collapse of coinage imports meant that fifth-century British cricket was doomed to be an amateur game and the collapse of the economy meant that very few Britons had the independent financial means to play. It's true that the scheduled ferry crossing from Dubris to Gaul to play in the internationals was cheap (the boats came one way laden with Anglo-Saxon invaders keen to slaughter everyone they met, but tended to go back empty), but a wealthy Briton hanging around on the quayside in his whites tended to attract the wrong sort of attention from gangs of layabout Jutes who were never going to be able to hold down proper jobs until they became literate, which was at least two centuries off.

The civitas centres kept the county game gong for a while, but piles of rotting corpses didn't make for good attacking play, even if they were broadly effective as night watchmen. Who can forget Boycottus lament "they've got to stop thinkin' about dyin' of plague and think about their battin'"?

Still, it wasn't all bad. Who also can forget the timeless classic "the batsman's Ceredic the bowler's Owain". They used to laugh like drains at the club tie suppers over that one.