Rome's Greatest Enemy

Kirialax

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
4,811
Blachernai
#43
And Rome didn't? Wouldn't they have cared about money and trade and conquest?
My point is that either Rome would have to garrison substantial forces in central and southern Mesopotamia if they wanted to hold Mesopotamia. If they wanted to truly break the Parthian or Sasanian polities, it would be necessary to campaign extensively on the Iranian plateau, where I suspect the risks of over-extension are quite real but the potential gains quite modest.
 
Likes: Talbot Vilna
May 2018
731
Michigan
#46
Funny how it was true from basically Sulla’s civil war up to the end of the Byzantines. Internal strife was one of the most constant elements of Rome!
Its like Lincoln's quote:

"All the armies of Europe and Asia...could not by force take a drink from the Ohio River or make a track on the Blue Ridge in the trial of a thousand years. No, if destruction be our lot we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of free men we will live forever or die by suicide.”
 
Sep 2017
720
United States
#47
Its like Lincoln's quote:

"All the armies of Europe and Asia...could not by force take a drink from the Ohio River or make a track on the Blue Ridge in the trial of a thousand years. No, if destruction be our lot we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of free men we will live forever or die by suicide.”
Very good point. I would think another civil war would be impossible, but our entire history is but a fraction of Rome's; I'm sure many Romans often thought the same thing!
 
Sep 2017
720
United States
#49
The Germanics. they couldn't handle them, and ultimately they brought down the Western Empire.
Which Germans specifically (thread asks for specific individuals, i.e. Genseric, Alaric, or Fritigern) ?

Also I'd argue that the Romans drained themselves fatally before the Germanics dealt the killing blow. When Rome was well-organized they were handing the Germanics defeats up until the death of Stilicho (by Emperor Honorius' order).
 
Jun 2015
5,723
UK
#50
Well Augustus humself couldn't defeat them. And even during the heights of the Empire, they had frequent incursions. This obviously led to Marcus Aurelius's wars, and in part the Crisis of the Third Century. They were always a bug-bear that was there during the good times, and ultimately brought them down.
 

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