Rome's greatest victory vs its greatest defeat.

Romes greatest victory vs greatest defeat

  • Battle of Silva Arsia-509 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Veii-396 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Aquilonia-293 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Agrigentum-261 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Llipa-206 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Thermopylae-191 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Corinth-146 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Aquae sextiae-102 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Vercellae-101 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of the Lycus-66 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Adamclisi- 102 ad

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Sarmisegetusa-106 ad

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Immae-272 ad

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Strasbourg-357 ad

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Pollentia-402 ad

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Other Victory

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Allia river-390 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of the Caudine Forks-321 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Arretium-285 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Herclea-280 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Asculum-279 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Deprana-249 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of the Trebia-218 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Lake Trasimene-217 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Noreia-112 bc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Carnuntum-170 ad

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Abrittus-251 ad

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Edessa-260 ad

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Callicinum-296 ad

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Other defeat

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    21
  • Poll closed .
Feb 2015
640
washington
#1
NOTE: In order for the poll to work you must vote for one victory and one defeat. Also I will be making it public so we will know if you broke the rules.
I will be starting off in the early republic era and ending at the date of 476 AD with the fall of the western Roman empire. Also only victories/defeats against foreign enemies will counted and battles that ended in a draw will not be included(so no cataulunian plains). Naval battles will be a part of this but I have tried avoid sieges unless they were truly important.
In order to keep the poll balanced there will be same number of victories as defeats.

Throughout her history Rome became the greatest imperial conqueror in all of antiquity, winning a great many victories but along the way suffered some truly terrible victories that while in the beginning only slowed her down near the end these would ultimately prove fatal. I am curious to see what you guys think was the greatest victory and the greatest defeat Rome was dealt in her history.
I have included the poll as a visual representation of the forums views but I hope to foster as much discussion as possible!
 

Sam-Nary

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
6,780
At present SD, USA
#2
The Battle of Zama stands to me as Rome's greatest victory, as it put Rome over a general who had just spent his time beating Rome at every single turn and put an end to the prospect of Carthage rivaling Rome within the balance of power in the ancient Mediterranean. And after Zama, Rome's power would continue to expand and so much so that even some of the defeats in the poll were little more than a hiccup with regard to Rome's strength...

The greatest defeat, for me would be the sack of Rome in 410 CE. While it wasn't the first time the Romans had engaged the barbarians and nor would it be the last, the sacking of Rome would give the Romans a tremendous amount of psychological trauma. The city Rome had never been in such danger since the Gauls during Rome's early days, and this time, the sacking of Rome simply demonstrated just how close to falling the Romans were. After this, there was no way the Western Roman Empire could really recover.
 
Feb 2015
640
washington
#3
The defeat at Arausio was arguably worse than Cannae. The Romans supposedly suffered 70,000-80,000 casualties, far more than even Cannae. At least against Carthage the Romans knew they were facing a powerful empire that could afford to hire proffesional troops. Plus the Romans knew that Hannibal was a very capable general. Losing even more troops to what the Romans considered a bunch of barbaric german tribes must have been far more embarrassing.

In terms of victories the Battle of Metaurus removed all chance of Hannibal defeating the Romans. At Zama he was using a spent force against Scipio and his defeat was inevitable at some point. But if the Carthaginian reinforcements had arrived to help Hannibal than he arguably could have had enough soldiers to crush Rome once and for all.
 

Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
5,050
Canary Islands-Spain
#4
Victory: Magnesia, 190 BC. The Seleucid Empire, the biggest state in the western world, was defeated by Rome, with the result of Rome getting the hegemony over most of the eastern Mediterranean. This allowed Rome to get a lot of money throug wars against the richest (and weak) states of the area. On the other hand, it started the crucial Hellenistic cultural influence over Rome.

Defeat: Adrianople, 378 CE. Rome had recovered from the turmoils of the 3rd century, so that Diocletian and Constantine stabilized and refounded the Empire. The 4th century Renaissance was broken when the Roman army of the East was annihilated in Adrianople. Once the Goths entered the Empire, the ERE didn't get stability for almost a century; in the West, it supposed the collapse of the Empire.
 
Apr 2011
3,075
New Jersey
#5
In terms of victories the Battle of Metaurus removed all chance of Hannibal defeating the Romans. At Zama he was using a spent force against Scipio and his defeat was inevitable at some point. But if the Carthaginian reinforcements had arrived to help Hannibal than he arguably could have had enough soldiers to crush Rome once and for all.
In this sense Dertosa was more important since it's doubtful Hasdrubal's men would have completely changed the tide of the war. With the victory at Dertosa the Romans prevented more Carthaginian armies from arriving than at Metaurus. Reinforcements on this occasion would have been more painful for Rome.
 
Feb 2015
640
washington
#6
In this sense Dertosa was more important since it's doubtful Hasdrubal's men would have completely changed the tide of the war. With the victory at Dertosa the Romans prevented more Carthaginian armies from arriving than at Metaurus. Reinforcements on this occasion would have been more painful for Rome.
My knowledge outside of the 2nd punic war is quite lmited outside the actions of Hannibal Barca and I didnt know about this battle until you mentioned it.
 
Sep 2015
7
Hollister California
#7
The Battle of Zama stands to me as Rome's greatest victory, as it put Rome over a general who had just spent his time beating Rome at every single turn and put an end to the prospect of Carthage rivaling Rome within the balance of power in the ancient Mediterranean. And after Zama, Rome's power would continue to expand and so much so that even some of the defeats in the poll were little more than a hiccup with regard to Rome's strength...

The greatest defeat, for me would be the sack of Rome in 410 CE. While it wasn't the first time the Romans had engaged the barbarians and nor would it be the last, the sacking of Rome would give the Romans a tremendous amount of psychological trauma. The city Rome had never been in such danger since the Gauls during Rome's early days, and this time, the sacking of Rome simply demonstrated just how close to falling the Romans were. After this, there was no way the Western Roman Empire could really recover.
I find the best part about the battle of Zama the fact that the general had great disdain for how Roman politicians treated soldiers, was given almost no support other than permission for passage to Africa by the council, and used all the soldiers that were considered 'misfits' or failures by the legions, and did nothing short of pound the only army challenging the Roman Empire at the time into the dust.
 
Jun 2015
5,723
UK
#8
I'd say the Sack of Rome (300 BCE) and Adrianpole were its worst defeats. But then for differing reasons. imho the first Sack made it militaristic and expansionist. Without this, I doubt there would have been a powerful Republic or eventual Empire. Adrianople was the beginning of the end.

Best victory, I'd say 1st Punic War. Victory from that point forward vs. Carthage was inevitable.
 

starman

Ad Honorem
Jan 2014
4,068
Connecticut
#10
The greatest defeat, for me would be the sack of Rome in 410 CE. While it wasn't the first time the Romans had engaged the barbarians and nor would it be the last, the sacking of Rome would give the Romans a tremendous amount of psychological trauma. The city Rome had never been in such danger since the Gauls during Rome's early days, and this time, the sacking of Rome simply demonstrated just how close to falling the Romans were. After this, there was no way the Western Roman Empire could really recover.
It was already essentially finished before 410, since the Romans themselves would no longer fight much and the desertion of Stilicho's barbarian forces left the West almost powerless.
The sack of Rome was a defeat but hardly a battle; it was just a matter of barbarians finishing off (almost) an effete nation.
 

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