Royal men that had a posthumous daughter

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,537
SoCal
#1
I previously created a thread for royal men who had a posthumous son. Thus, I figure that I might as well create a separate thread for royal men who had a posthumous daughter.

Anyway, which royal men do you know of who had a posthumous daughter?

So far, I can think of:

King Charles IV of France: Charles IV of France - Wikipedia

King Philip VI of France: Philip VI of France - Wikipedia

Also, here is a near-miss:

Rene, Duke of Alencon: René, Duke of Alençon - Wikipedia

He died just two days after the birth of his second legitimate daughter. Had he died just three days earlier or more, he would have qualified for this list.

Anyway, which other royal men qualify for this list?
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,658
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#3
If a royal man has a posthumous child - son or daughter - and that posthumous child has children of their own and eventually after a few centuries is the ancestor of thousands of members of European royalty and nobility, then occasionally one of those descendants will think that if the royal man died just a little bit earlier their posthumous child would never have been conceived and the present descendant would never have been born. And the same goes for non royal persons and their posthumous children if their descendants are known after centuries.

The most famous posthumous daughter in European royalty that I can think of off the top of my head is Empress Constance.

The first King of Sicily, Roger II, was born 22 December 1095 and died 26 February 1154. Roger II of Sicily - Wikipedia His posthumous daughter Constance was born 2 November 1194 - 8 months and 7 days after Roger II died - and died 27 November 1198. Constance, Queen of Sicily - Wikipedia Constance and her husband Emperor Henry VI had one child, Emperor Frederick II (1194-1250) who has many descendants among European royalty and nobility.

The Wikipedia article on Posthumous Birth - Posthumous birth - Wikipedia - lists many males born posthumously since ancient times, but the first posthumous born female listed is in the 18th century.

Frederick Lewis, prince of Wales 1707-1751, died on March 31, 1751. Frederick, Prince of Wales - Wikipedia His daughter Caroline Matilda was born about 4 months later on 22 July 1751 and died on 10 May 1775 after a short but rather eventual life. She married King Christian VII of Denmark and Norway when only 15 and gave birth to the future King Frederick VI of Denmark on 28 January 1768 when aged 16 years 6 months and 6 days. She began an affair with Dr. Johann Fredrick Struensee who was treating the mental illness of the king. Struensee gained control of the government with the support of both the king and the Queen, and decreed many radical reforms. Struensee's opponents captured him and the queen in January 1772, and had Struensee executed and Queen Caroline divorced and exiled. Former Queen Caroline lived a quiet life in exile in Germany, but Danish dissidents plotting to make her regent for her son Frederick VI enlisted her in the plot and she in turn enlisted her brother King George III, but then died suddenly of scarlet fever.

At that time the throne of Denmark passed by Agnatic (male only primogeniture), so when Caroline's son Frederick VI died in 1839 survived by 2 daughters his half first cousin became King Christian VIII. Frederick VI's two surviving daughters were both childless. But there are descendants of Queen Caroline through her daughter Louise Auguste (1771-1843) whose present heir is Hubertus Christoph Joachim Friedrich von der Osten (born 1964). But it is widely believed that Princess Louise Auguste was the child of Struensee and not of Christian VII. See post # 12 here: Heirs of the Kingdom of Denmark

King Alexander of Greece (1893-1920) died 25 October 1920 (from a monkey bite) Alexander of Greece - Wikipedia His daughter Alexandra was born 25 March 1921. Alexandra of Yugoslavia - Wikipedia Alexandra (1921-1993) married exiled King Peter II of Yugoslavia. Alexander, Crown Prince of Yugoslavia - Wikipedia Their child Crown Prince Alexander (b. 1945) is the current claimant of the throne.

Emperor Charles I of Austria, king of Hungary and Bohemia, etc. etc. (1887-1 April 1922) Charles I of Austria - Wikipedia had a youngest daughter, Archduchess Elizabeth born 31 May 1922. Elizabeth (1922-1993) married Prince Heinrich of Lichtenstein,a cousin of the reigning prince. Archduchess Elisabeth of Austria (1922–1993) - Wikipedia

Prince Ali-Reza Pahlavi (1966-2011), younger son of the deposed king of kings, committed suicide on 4 January 2011. Ali-Reza Pahlavi - Wikipedia His daughter Princess Iryana Leila was born 6 months later on 26 July 2011.

Since royal families, like everyone else, tend to have about 50 percent female children, the vast difference in the number of male and female posthumous royal children in the list in the article on posthumous birth shows that the compilier has been far more interested in finding posthumous royal sons than posthumous royal daughters.
 
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MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,658
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#4
There would have been a case of posthumous children in the Ottoman dynasty except for___.

The Ottoman Padishah and Sultan Murad III (1546-1595) died on 15/16 January 1595 and his son Mehmed III (1566-1603) became the next ruler. Mehmed III had 19 of his younger brothers and half brothers killed on 28 January 1595, though Wikpedia lists 21 names of the victims. They included young men, teenage boys, and pre teen boys. It is also said that Mehmed III had all of his father's pregnant concubines killed. If that is true, then Murad III would have had some posthumous sons and daughters if Mehmed III hadn't pruned the family tree so thoroughly.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,537
SoCal
#5
There would have been a case of posthumous children in the Ottoman dynasty except for___.

The Ottoman Padishah and Sultan Murad III (1546-1595) died on 15/16 January 1595 and his son Mehmed III (1566-1603) became the next ruler. Mehmed III had 19 of his younger brothers and half brothers killed on 28 January 1595, though Wikpedia lists 21 names of the victims. They included young men, teenage boys, and pre teen boys. It is also said that Mehmed III had all of his father's pregnant concubines killed. If that is true, then Murad III would have had some posthumous sons and daughters if Mehmed III hadn't pruned the family tree so thoroughly.
For some reason Eastern royal families such as the Ottomans and the Romanovs appear to have been rather fond of killing their own family members. :(