Russian conquest of Eastern Russia and Sibeia

Aug 2018
350
Southern Indiana
#1
I'm interested in knowing more about the Russian expansion east during the 16th and 17th centuries. In many ways it mirrors what happened to the Native Americans, but is relatively unknown in comparison. Any good resources on the subject?
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
2,723
Republika Srpska
#3
It was just as bloody as America's contact with the natives.

Yes, it was rather devastating. The Russians didn't really care about the lives of the old peoples of Siberia or other territories. Russian expeditions under Vasiliy Poyarkov and Yerofey Khabarov became infamous for their massacres of the natives. Cossacks also terrorized the native populations of Kamchatka, klling around 10-15,000 in around 50 years. Vladimir Atlasov's expedition to Kamchatka left 12,000 Chukchi, 8,000 Kamchadals and 8,000 Koraks dead. The Chukchi people were often targeted for example. The Chukchi were not innocent either, they would often kidnap Russian women and children etc. After the Chukchi managed to defeat the Russians at Penzhina Bay in 1729, the Russians decided to retaliate. Under the command of Dmitry Pavlutsky, they unleashed a reign of terror upon the Chukchi, often destroying entire villages, capturing women and children. In 1742, the Senate of Russian Empress Elizabeth decided that the Chukchi and the Koraks should be "totally extirpated". This new campaign was basically a campaign of genocide and Pavlutsky was once again leading it. Pavlutsky destroyed entire communities with the help of "almighty God and to the good fortune of Her Imperial Majesty". The Chukchis and the Koraks would often kill their family members to prevent them from falling into Russian hands.

Pavlutsky would be killed by the Chukchis in 1747. The wars with them would continue, and eventually their position would somewhat improve in the 19th century. For example, their rights to their territory would be confirmed in 1837, etc. The Aleuts would fare little better, the men would often be killed and the women captured. Eventually, Catherine the Great would be forced to intervene and stop the atrocities. Other people groups like the Yakuts would also suffer, in fact from 1642 to 1682 Yakut population declined by 70%. However, worse than Russian terror was disease. For example, smallpox epidemic in Kamchatka in 1796 devastated Chukchi and Itelmen communities, typhus killed many in 1799. Smallpox reached western Siberia in the 1630s and would eventually spread, killing 80% of Tungus and Yakuts. The Yukaghir people lost 44% of their population due to smallpox. There were other diseases like measles that also hit the Siberian, Kamchatkan and other eastern peoples.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,381
Sydney
#4
It was done by private capital , using Cossack ( a rather loose term then ) as mercenary
like the Spanish conquistadors , their position was perilous in the extreme
Yermak played alliances and utter devastation as the situation demanded
his first priority was the destroy the Siberian Khanate , a left over of the mongols
the locals were pretty enthusiastic about that
of course , they came to review their feelings when the Russians didn't leave but replaced their old masters with a new one
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,398
Portugal
#5
There are several threads with this theme, but I still didn’t saw here a link to an Academic study about the Russian expansion in Asia, and even with some good posts here, I still would like to see here some link, or at least some recommended bibliography.
 
Likes: Hoosierhiver

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
2,723
Republika Srpska
#6
You can check
J. Forsyth, A History of the Peoples of Siberia: Russia's North Asian Colony
V. Ann Kivelson, Cartographies of Tsardom: The Land and its meaning in 17th century Russia
W. Bruce Lincoln, The Conquest of a Continent: Siberia and the Russians
 
Nov 2015
1,741
Kyiv
#8
Hoosierhiver, you have turned to a difficult and, as it seems to me, insufficiently explored by historians topic - the conquest of Siberia by the Russians. In Russia itself it has been under strong political influence since the 1930s in the context of the false idea of the "peaceful entry of the peoples of Siberia into the Russian state".

A number of references to the works of English-speaking researchers can be found at the end of this article in the Russian wiki.

Покорение Сибири — Википедия

e.g. - (PDF) Inventing Siberia: Visions of the Russian East in the Early Nineteenth Century
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,398
Portugal
#9
You can check

J. Forsyth, A History of the Peoples of Siberia: Russia's North Asian Colony
V. Ann Kivelson, Cartographies of Tsardom: The Land and its meaning in 17th century Russia
W. Bruce Lincoln, The Conquest of a Continent: Siberia and the Russians
Thank you Maki!

Not academic, but interesting and seems well written.

Hoosierhiver, you have turned to a difficult and, as it seems to me, insufficiently explored by historians topic - the conquest of Siberia by the Russians. In Russia itself it has been under strong political influence since the 1930s in the context of the false idea of the "peaceful entry of the peoples of Siberia into the Russian state".

A number of references to the works of English-speaking researchers can be found at the end of this article in the Russian wiki.

Покорение Сибири — Википедия

e.g. - (PDF) Inventing Siberia: Visions of the Russian East in the Early Nineteenth Century
Thanks for the links. The one in Wikipedia lead me to this (in English) that is worth to check: http://history.emory.edu/home/documents/endeavors/volume4/EmoryEndeavors4Complete.pdf
 

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