Saddest music you've heard

Linschoten

Ad Honoris
Aug 2010
15,678
Welsh Marches
#32
Can't get much sadder than this, Hugo Wolf setting of a bleak poem by Michelangelo (with English subtitles):


Or if you need cheering up, Brahms, O Death, how bitter thou art (with subtitles):

 
Feb 2016
4,260
Japan
#33
Some of the saddest ones I like.

Kate Rusby - Sho Heen.

Song Of Seikilos - Seikilos.

A Dying Sailor To His Shipmates - traditional. This one is by Bono

Suicide Note Part 1 - Pantera.

Massive Attack - Teardrop
 
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
#35
I was never big on Dylan. I think that's the only song of his I know. I listen more to band like Queen and the transition era to early rock n roll in the 50s. The Platters is probably what I listen to the most. And various European folk music.

I like ABBA a lot. A lot if their songs can be interpreted as either happy or sad. They have this Scandinavian melancholy, which I can appreciate and it really depends on your mood how you perceive their music.
I hadn't thought of 'Scandinavian melancholy'. I know it's at thing which apparently gets worse the further north you go. Has it anything to do with lack of sunlight?

Are you saying it's part of the Scandinavian psyche? Having done a bit of travelling, in my own country as well as overseas,I've certainly noticed what could be called national characteristics Eg Aussies tend to be irreverent, casual and egalitarian. We hate people 'getting up themselves' and will gleefully chop them down to size, in what is called" the Tall Poppy Syndrome".

I've also noticed significant differences between the Chinese and the Japanese as well as between the French and the Austrians., to mention just a few.

Geez, that Kyartel number is a dirge, as they mournfully trudge up a snowy hill . Has somebody just died? Beautiful harmony though . Puts me in mind of Gregorian chants, which I love..


 

Shtajerc

Ad Honorem
Jul 2014
6,474
Lower Styria, Slovenia
#36
I hadn't thought of 'Scandinavian melancholy'. I know it's at thing which apparently gets worse the further north you go. Has it anything to do with lack of sunlight?

Are you saying it's part of the Scandinavian psyche? Having done a bit of travelling, in my own country as well as overseas,I've certainly noticed what could be called national characteristics Eg Aussies tend to be irreverent, casual and egalitarian. We hate people 'getting up themselves' and will gleefully chop them down to size, in what is called" the Tall Poppy Syndrome".

I've also noticed significant differences between the Chinese and the Japanese as well as between the French and the Austrians., to mention just a few.

Geez, that Kyartel number is a dirge, as they mournfully trudge up a snowy hill . Has somebody just died? Beautiful harmony though . Puts me in mind of Gregorian chants, which I love..


I think it does. The long linter with little sunlight has to have some impact on people although statistically the most suicides happen in summer when people are more often alone because there's no school, their friends are on holiday at work etc.

There's a difference in temperament in Europe for sure. Southern Europe, France and the Balkans - they are fiery, they touch and kiss each other a lot etc. In Central Europe it's already colder, you just shake hands, kisses on the cheek are only for birthdays. I've only been up North once, to little to get a meaningul impression. In Eastern European cities like St Peterburg or Moscow people will seem very cold and annoyed on the streets - that's a big city thing. That's generally the thing with us Slavs, we're more reserved at start than Americans, but once we know you more and see that we can trust you, we're very warm people. We also tell it straight to your face, we don't pretend.

The song where they walk up the hill is about a faithful girlfriend who died.
 
Likes: bboomer

Solidaire

Ad Honorem
Aug 2009
5,423
Athens, Greece
#37
Since folk music has been touched, I'm tempted to post something from my country as well, but it might seem too alien to most of you. Greek folk and popular music (rembetika) has some of the saddest songs I've ever heard, surprising as that may seem to people usually projecting carefree sunny summer images to the country and its people. There's one genre in particular, the miroloyia, ritual lament for the dead, which goes back to ancient Greece as a tradition and music, and is still alive in certain rural parts of the country, like Epirus and Mani.

Margaret Alexiou, The Ritual Lament in Greek Tradition

"Lament from Epirus" An Odyssey into Greek folk music
 
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
#38
Just accidently came across this piece on Youtube.

It's called ' The Kol Nidrei' and it is traditionally played on Yom Kippur. This is the Day of atonement, perhaps the holiest day in Judaism.

The first version I've chosen is with orchestra and violin.


The second version is voice, sung by Jan Peerce , a world famous tenor in the first half of the twentieth century.

 

deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
13,842
Europix
#39
Not necessarily the saddest (I have a longer list of "saddest", and I can't make a hierarchy in it), but still, for a national anthem ... it is quit melancholic ...

A beautiful interpretation of "Hymnusz" (the Hungarian National Anthem) by the Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra and Choir of the


 
Likes: bboomer

Solidaire

Ad Honorem
Aug 2009
5,423
Athens, Greece
#40
It would be a pity if this thread is to be forgotten without mentioning some Pink Floyd songs and their exceptional lyrics.

The old classic "Time"

Two remarks: first, this song bites much harder as time indeed flies by, far more than when I was first listening to it in my teens,
and second, alas, "hanging on in quiet desperation" is not exclusively "the English way".


"I've got wild staring eyes
And I've got a strong urge to fly
But I got nowhere to fly to"

The above verse alone would suffice to include "Nobody Home" in this thread, even if it hadn't been part of one of the saddest (and best) concept albums ever written. Most songs from "the Wall" would easily fit in here. Like "Hey You".


And an all time favourite, "Wish You Were Here"
 

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