Saint Helena - first inhabitants?

Jul 2011
579
western Europe
#1
There seems to be no proof of the slightest human pre-colonial presence on the island. Nonetheless, are there any clues alluding toward the possibility of an indigenous population (who, when, for how long etc.)?

What can we assume?
 
Nov 2010
7,644
Cornwall
#2
There seems to be no proof of the slightest human pre-colonial presence on the island. Nonetheless, are there any clues alluding toward the possibility of an indigenous population (who, when, for how long etc.)?

What can we assume?
We can assume it was uninhabited.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Saint_Helena

Maybe colonisation can be universally perceived as good if there's no one in the way?
 
Jul 2011
579
western Europe
#3
johnincornwall said:
Maybe colonisation can be universally perceived as good if there's no one in the way?
It wouldn't be called colonization then, would it?

There might have been some former settlement on the island (either by Africans or Native Americans - or both). Even though at present we lack evidence, we cannot discard it either.
 
Last edited:

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,532
Portugal
#4
There seems to be no proof of the slightest human pre-colonial presence on the island. Nonetheless, are there any clues alluding toward the possibility of an indigenous population (who, when, for how long etc.)?

What can we assume?
Since that when the Portuguese arrived there it was inhabited, and since we don’t have records of previous inhabitants or any archaeological evidence, we must assume until such records appear, if they ever appear, that the first inhabitants were seasonal Portuguese sailors.

As for the previous presence of Africans or Americans it seems unlikely since they only practiced coastal navigation in the Atlantic. Quite different scenario from the intense navigation in the Indian Ocean, or the possible bridge between Oceania and America in the South Pacific.
 
Jul 2011
579
western Europe
#5
^Why would navigational bridges have existed across all oceans except the Atlantic though? Given the likelihood of pre-Columbian crossings, it is more than possible the island once saw human settlement.

Why they eventually left or disappeared may be a tougher question.
 
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Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,532
Portugal
#6
Given the likelihood of pre-Columbian crossings, it is more than possible the island once saw human settlement.
Likelihood, in the South Atlantic? Well, that is a matter of opinion, and since we don’t have evidences it is purely speculative, almost bordering fiction.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,532
Portugal
#9
Jul 2011
579
western Europe
#10
If pre-Columbian transatlantic crossings are likely to have happened, then it is unwise to discard the possibility of ancient human settlement on the island.
 

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