Scotch-Irish & Black Irish

Sindane

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,621
Europe
#72
It is not recent. It used in a letter by Elizabeth I, who died in 1603.

Scotch-Irish may have been used more commonly in the Americas than the United Kingdom, but it did not originate there and is not modern.
Elizabeth I used the term once and do we even fully understand what she meant by it?

Look at the census. If this was a common term people would have used it. The first time I ever saw it being used was by USA tree researchers on a large genealogy forum, and Irish, British and even some American people were asking what it meant. Because no one had ever heard it before

Elizabeth, and also one of the James's, used the term 'reiver' once, now you see people on genealogy forums who think they are descended from the so called 'Border Reivers'.

People latch into words and blow them up out of all proportion
 

Scaeva

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,433
#74
Elizabeth I used the term once and do we even fully understand what she meant by it?

Look at the census. If this was a common term people would have used it. The first time I ever saw it being used was by USA tree researchers on a large genealogy forum, and Irish, British and even some American people were asking what it meant. Because no one had ever heard it before

Elizabeth, and also one of the James's, used the term 'reiver' once, now you see people on genealogy forums who think they are descended from the so called 'Border Reivers'.

People latch into words and blow them up out of all proportion
Elizabeth's meaning was quite clear. It was also used in the Americas during the colonial period.

Whether or not it is appropriate to use the term today, it nevertheless is a historical term that dates back to 16th Century Britain.
 

Sindane

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,621
Europe
#75
Elizabeth's meaning was quite clear. It was also used in the Americas during the colonial period.

Whether or not it is appropriate to use the term today, it nevertheless is a historical term that dates back to 16th Century Britain.

There might be a handful of written examples of it being used, but that doesn't mean it was in widespread usage
 

Sindane

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,621
Europe
#77
As the link said the 2012 census in America
There was no USA census in 2012. The next census is 2020.
They might be meaning the 2010 census?

The problem with very recent census forms is that you can more or less identify as whatever you like. The lists of categories became quite long . I cant remember the exact term but it was probably something like 'ethnic identity'? Which is a choice really. So in say 2000 they may have introduced a 'Scots-Irish' choice to the list, but then decided to remove it for a following census. This is what the article seems to be about.
This self identifying from a long list of possibilities is a recent question.
The questions previously were much simpler
 

Sindane

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,621
Europe
#78
Looks like the 'Scotch Irish' census classification, or a self identity question, started in 1980? You can see the huge increase by 1990. This is when a lot of genealogy records had started to become available.

'Year and Number of Scotch-Irish Americans' (census)

1980- 16,418

1990- 5,617,773

2000- 4,319,232

2010- 3,257,161
 
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M9Powell

Ad Honorem
Oct 2014
4,308
appalacian Mtns
#79
The term Scots-Irish definitely was around prior to 1980. I was born in the Appalachians in the 1950s. I've lived amongst Scots-Irish people most of my life & have often been wrongly called that myself. This label is often erroneously applied too the many people of Gaelic Irish or Scottish decent. Most people think it applies to anyone whose ancestors were from Scotland or Ireland.
I hate the spell correct on my kindle. It just changed Gaelic into Garlic ))).
 
Sep 2013
1,410
Ulster
#80
Looks like the 'Scotch Irish' census classification, or a self identity question, started in 1980? You can see the huge increase by 1990. This is when a lot of genealogy records had started to become available.

'Year and Number of Scotch-Irish Americans' (census)

1980- 16,418

1990- 5,617,773

2000- 4,319,232

2010- 3,257,161
Thanks for that info I wasn't aware of the actual numbers. How does it work re the Irish in America in the census are they classified as Irish or Irish-American. Is there a separate classification for them to use Irish-American.
 
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