Scottish Clearances Cultural Genocide?

Sep 2008
268
Orkney, United Kingdom
#11
But it just isn't British history unless you blame the English for everything.

I think the books highlight it more so due to the fact that it is better documented and it ties in nicely with the rise of industrialism. I understand the view of 'cultural genocide' as it appears like that to me as well. How would this be seen these day's? would you lable the workers refugees?
Could you expand on the refugee bit please?
 
Nov 2008
69
Lincoln,UK
#12
Although no war has taken place these people still can no longer live where they were due to they loss of their homes and jobs and are therefore forced to move onto other peoples lands and try to make a living elsewhere.
 
Jul 2007
9,098
Canada
#13
Perhaps history books/historians made Scotland more prominant in their writings?
Hmmm ... well the transition in England (the Enclosures) is fairly prominent among historians too.

It's just that it takes place earlier and over a much longer period of time - the removal of feudal tenure rights and access to commons in England took place over several centuries. In Scotland, the landowners decided to "update" practices and end the feudal systems of land management practically overnight, over just a few decades.
 
Sep 2008
268
Orkney, United Kingdom
#14
Although no war has taken place these people still can no longer live where they were due to they loss of their homes and jobs and are therefore forced to move onto other peoples lands and try to make a living elsewhere.
Thanks Dan, I think technically yes. If any group of people are forced from their area (usually a large area of a country I think you will agree). They take with them their culture, their way of life. And as a result the area loses that culture and quite often it is a rich culture. Though these cultures often survive as did the Scots culture, it is also in danger of being diluted or merged into their host culture. This then could cause a hybrid culture but the essence of the original is lost.
 
Sep 2008
268
Orkney, United Kingdom
#15
Hmmm ... well the transition in England (the Enclosures) is fairly prominent among historians too.

It's just that it takes place earlier and over a much longer period of time - the removal of feudal tenure rights and access to commons in England took place over several centuries. In Scotland, the landowners decided to "update" practices and end the feudal systems of land management practically overnight, over just a few decades.
Perhaps also the natural animosity between the two has highlighted the Clearances more than the Enclosures (Of course this dependes on which of the border you live)?.
 
Jul 2007
9,098
Canada
#16
Perhaps also the natural animosity between the two has highlighted the Clearances more than the Enclosures (Of course this dependes on which of the border you live)?.
No ... I don't really think so. The Clearances were much more of a spectacle, much more visible. It wasn't a slow process affecting only a few here and there at a time, as the Enclosures and the removal of the commoners' feudal-era property rights was in England. It was a massive, shocking transformation that impacted a large segment of the population in a short period of time, so it was a more apparent crisis.
 

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