Seiges where the defendants were vastly outnumbered but sucessful

Lord Oda Nobunaga

Ad Honorem
Jan 2015
5,650
Ontario, Canada
The siege of the English held Chateau Gaillard by Philip II of France from 1203 to 1204 for 8 months. The English held onto the fortress and Normandy was saved. King John managed to hold onto at least a portion of his French inheritance.

For almost three months the Polish had besieged Marienburg/Malbork Castle in 1204. Though the Polish and Lithuanians had defeated the Teutonic Knights at the Battle of Grunwald they were unable to take this castle and the Ordensstaat was saved. Eventually the Teutonic Order would turn into the Duchy of Prussia and from there become a permanent thorn in the side of Poland for centuries.
 
Apr 2015
627
Paris
Lord Oda Nobunaga said:
The siege of the English held Chateau Gaillard by Philip II of France from 1203 to 1204 for 8 months. The English held onto the fortress and Normandy was saved. King John managed to hold onto at least a portion of his French inheritance.
Not quite. When Philip Augustus laid siege to Château-Gaillard, he had already opened up the water road to Rouen. The fortress was foremost a symbolic token of his conquest of Normandy, so he took his time and wait in blocus siege. When the fortress fall to a surprise storming (by the window of the chapel), the French Army had only loose 4 knights and was very much in shape for taking the rest of Normandy. In less than four months, Philip Augustus managed to take the duchy and was able to go south and started chewing the Loire counties. The siege of Château-Gaillard had no influence on the truce concluded in october 1206 ; it was rather the will of the french king, eager to build up his power in the recently conquered provinces and not to overstretch his might by going further south Aquitaine.
 

Lord Oda Nobunaga

Ad Honorem
Jan 2015
5,650
Ontario, Canada
Not quite. When Philip Augustus laid siege to Château-Gaillard, he had already opened up the water road to Rouen. The fortress was foremost a symbolic token of his conquest of Normandy, so he took his time and wait in blocus siege. When the fortress fall to a surprise storming (by the window of the chapel), the French Army had only loose 4 knights and was very much in shape for taking the rest of Normandy. In less than four months, Philip Augustus managed to take the duchy and was able to go south and started chewing the Loire counties. The siege of Château-Gaillard had no influence on the truce concluded in october 1206 ; it was rather the will of the french king, eager to build up his power in the recently conquered provinces and not to overstretch his might by going further south Aquitaine.
Why did I say that Chateau Gaillard was an English victory? Strange. It was taken by the French.