Seljuk (and other Turkic Anatolian) architecture

antocya

Ad Honorem
May 2012
5,775
Iraq
#1
Recently I visited some places in Turkey and I was wondering if people have some background info about the significance or anything.

I visited Ahlat in Bitlis and they had some interested reliefs on stones. I was wondering what if any significance they had.






This was an old tombstone with some designs.



And then this was a large tomb which seems to have some different styles, it looks similar to an Armenian church at least superficially but I'm not exactly suggesting that origin, it was clearly a tomb from the beginning. The only thing I know about it really was that the stone is particular to the area and that people in Ahlat still use that type of stone for building.



Anyway, what I wanted with this thread was for people to discuss Anatolian architecture from around this period but it doesn't have to be strictly Seljuk, like it could be Artukid or something else.
 
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antocya

Ad Honorem
May 2012
5,775
Iraq
#2
This is another old tomb found in the same location.



It was interesting to compare it to a tomb I saw in Hasankeyf which had a very different style, it's the mausoleum of the son of Uzun Hasan, of the Akkoyunlu.



 
Mar 2012
550
Istanbul
#3
I'm curious about this post, because I saw places and architecture like this. But I was a boy and didn't know anything about them. There were also tombs like this in Hakkari / Çukurca and Van / Başkale province but it was very far away from civilization. Nobody noticed but i remember it.
 

antocya

Ad Honorem
May 2012
5,775
Iraq
#4
Are you talking about the photos in the first post? I've seen a lot of similar tombs.

This is from the Çifte Minareli Medrese in Erzurum. The back part is a tomb and some people still go there to pray.



This is a photo of the front of it. The medrese dates from 1271.

 
Feb 2010
1,563
#5
Nice photos! Seljuk architecture was clearly very Iranian in its character, unlike the Ottoman one, which assimilated a lot of Byzantine influences. It's interesting that the most characteristic Ottoman type of mosques with domes is modelled after Hagia Sophia.

I am not sure if there are many significant Ottoman period buildings in central Anatolia.
 
Mar 2012
550
Istanbul
#6
Yes but smaller types... They were ruined so much and they were far different from Ottoman architecture. I found this one:



And these are old houses which are very close to this tomb.

 
Last edited:
Jun 2010
1,935
Dehradun
#7
I am no expert in Anatolian architecture but the images are really nice.

Recently I visited some places in Turkey and I was wondering if people have some background info about the significance or anything.

I visited Ahlat in Bitlis and they had some interested reliefs on stones. I was wondering what if any significance they had.


Looks like the person with Mongoloid features is holding a Buddhist prayer wheel. [ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prayer_wheel]Prayer wheel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]




This was an old tombstone with some designs.
Look like a couple of Chinese Dragons.



And then this was a large tomb which seems to have some different styles, it looks similar to an Armenian church at least superficially but I'm not exactly suggesting that origin, it was clearly a tomb from the beginning. The only thing I know about it really was that the stone is particular to the area and that people in Ahlat still use that type of stone for building.



Anyway, what I wanted with this thread was for people to discuss Anatolian architecture from around this period but it doesn't have to be strictly Seljuk, like it could be Artukid or something else.
I have seen them in a music video.

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w9nMlcsJSLg]Anadolunun Giri[/ame]
 

antocya

Ad Honorem
May 2012
5,775
Iraq
#8
Yes but smaller types... They were ruined so much and they were far different from Ottoman architecture. I found this one:



And these are old houses which are very close to this tomb.

Where is this?

I am no expert in Anatolian architecture but the images are really nice.



Looks like the person with Mongoloid features is holding a Buddhist prayer wheel. Prayer wheel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
That's interesting, I didn't notice the prayer wheel similarity.
 

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