Settlement of South Africa

May 2017
850
France
#51
Hello everybody and thank you very much.Is it possible to know the number of South afrikaners soldiers killed during the world war one,and among them the number who had french names:
Ex:pienaar,ex Pinard.Du Toyt,ex Dutoit.Roussuw,ex Rousseau.Duplessis,Devilliers etc....
 
Mar 2015
1,346
Yorkshire
#52
Hello everybody and thank you very much.Is it possible to know the number of South afrikaners soldiers killed during the world war one,and among them the number who had french names:
Ex:pienaar,ex Pinard.Du Toyt,ex Dutoit.Roussuw,ex Rousseau.Duplessis,Devilliers etc....



You can search the Commonwealth War Graves:


https://www.cwgc.org/find/find-war-dead-and-cemeteries/how-to-search


You can search by regiment and by name of the individual.



Might take a little time but its a brilliant site.
 

Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
5,017
Netherlands
#53
Why would the Zulu's need to move South when they were in the South??? Willempie, you really need to study a bit of South African history. The statement which you have made above makes no sense at all, if you take it within the context of South African history.
How is moving into Xhosa territory not south?
 
Mar 2012
1,579
Following the breeze
#54
How is moving into Xhosa territory not south?
I completely understand what you are try to point out, however your information is incorrect. What you are referring to is a completely different period in South African history, as compared to the discussion at hand.

When you are refer to the "Zulu's", you are referring to the Zulu's during the "Mfecane/Difaqane" period. This period has nothing to do with the "Bantu migration" period(even though it did result in the emergence of new cultural groups). During this era the Zulu nation, as you are referring to it, did not exist.



The Zulu Kingdom, or people, were actually formed by Shaka as he went about conquer and uniting a group of tribes that occupied the region you see marked in orange on the above map. These united tribes then formed a common identity which lead to what is know as the Zulu people or Zulu Kingdom. Before this process, there was no Zulu's, as you are referring to them, thus they could not go South because they did not exist.

Another key point, is that these tribes where already long since settled and established within these regions before they became part of the Zulu Kingdom.

With regards to the Xhosa's, the region(marked in green on the map)was actually annexed by the Cape(IOW the British or Dutch administration, depending on the era) during the course of the Xhosa Wars, and not the Zulu's as you are implying.
 
Mar 2015
1,346
Yorkshire
#55
Since this thread does not seem to be advancing with any urgency, I will stick my neck out and post up some thoughts.

The San and Khoikhoi should not be labelled as same "people" and are very diverse amongst themselves and completely different to the Bantu - happy to discuss this in more detail but I will leave that for now.

Prior to the arrival of the Europeans, the Bantu were the last to push down into South Africa probably displacing the Khoikhoi in the North East but as Ancient-geezer says never (or only rarely) crossed the Fish river.

The Bantu explosion out of the Homeland of Cameroon\East Nigeria is a recent event. Some have argued for cultural diffusion but now most see this as mainly a demic expansion with a new population pushing aside or absorbing earlier populations.

5000 years BCE (ie 7000 BP) the Bantu peoples were confined to a relatively small area of Western Africa. However having gained the knowledge of iron technology and improved farming, they were able to expand swiftly in two streams around the Congo (although there is an argument for a Savannah corridor in the Congo at 1000 years BCE), arriving in the Great Lakes around 500 BCE and the Zambezi area by 500 AD, South Africa( Natal) between this date and 1000AD and there they halted.

There is dispute about how strong the West as opposed to East Bantu streams were but this is pretty irrelevant when it comes to South Africa.

The following maps were computed from archaeological and geo-linguistics (over 500 Bantu languages helps!).


 
Mar 2015
1,346
Yorkshire
#56
Hello everybody and thank you very much.Is it possible to know the number of South afrikaners soldiers killed during the world war one,and among them the number who had french names:
Ex:pienaar,ex Pinard.Du Toyt,ex Dutoit.Roussuw,ex Rousseau.Duplessis,Devilliers etc....

Don't know if you are doing any work on this but here is another excellent site.


https://www.southafricawargraves.org/research.htm


Once again you will need to have a list of French names and pump these into the search field (there are asterisks to allow near guesses). I tried Pienaar, WW2 and got five names, the same individuals in both sets of data.
 
Oct 2011
7,654
MARE PACIFICVM
#58
So what is the short version of the current land reforms?

What I keep hearing is that land owned by white South Africans is being confiscated by force by the government to be redistributed to black South Africans, even in cases where the current white residents had nothing to do with the orignal takeover of said land. If so, this sounds awful.

My view is that if there are whites currently living on land which was stolen from black landowners WHO ARE STILL ALIVE, then the land should be returned immediately. If we are talking about land which was taken by the ANCESTORS of modern Boers from the ANCESTORS of modern blacks, absolutely no redistribution should be conducted. It would be a case of government sponsored ancestral guilt which is a very steep and very slippery slope into Hell.
 
Likes: Frank81
Jul 2018
63
North America
#59
It is just a nightmare. You see the exact same reasoning as you have seen with the Yugo wars. Being white is enough to disqualify you for land, like being Bosnian. And most (like over 90%) of the farmer land wasn't inhabited at all, before the Boers came. And no you cant wage a war against natives the way the boers were (not) organized. Taking land from tribes would have been extremely difficult for them.

No. But it is going to. You will get the exact same things as you had with Croats in Serbia. "Kill the Boer, kill the farmer" must bring back some memories by association.
My own famil members suffered in Tanzania under same project. God bless usa for rescuing my family right before brown genocide there.
 

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