Should African borders be rebooted?

Nov 2018
105
Idaho
#41
Many modern African 'states' are a collection of mutally antagonistic tribes with a tiny foreign-sanctioned kleptocracy which has no power outside of its compounds and army barracks. They exist to legitimize the extortion (by natives and foreigners) of the population and its resources under a pretense of legality. They're basically puppet UN/UK/US governments, and do not represent the interests or will of most people living in them. Not that Europe is much better, their tyrants just have more control and can rely on the pious delusions of the people who still believe in good government.
 

macon

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
3,868
Slovenia, EU
#42
I don't know what the situation is with the Catalans, but there are some stark differences between some regions in certain African countries such as Cote d'Ivoire or Nigeria in terms of things like school enrollment, economic activity, etc. This is a result of certain historical factors (for example, the educational disparity that exists between regions in Nigeria today took root at least a century ago, if not earlier; this source provides an overview of how and why it came about).

It is certainly not just a matter of perception. Also, while there do exist some people ignorantly shouting (or even writing books explicitly claiming) "we are better" for this or that reason (without even knowing the historical context behind some of the disparities that they are highlighting) in certain African countries, including Nigeria, that does not really change the point that such groups are still being held back in some ways from realizing their potential and deciding their own affairs without interference.



The Northwest and North-central could form one country. If the Northeast wants it could join that country, or form its own country, and this newly formed country, probably called Borno or Bornu, could also be given some land in Chad and Niger as well - the parts where the Kanuri speakers are.

The Central parts of Nigeria could form their own federation from the Tiv, Jukun, Igala, and other groups. If a few groups want their own republic (for example a Tiv Republic) those could be formed as well.

The Southeastern part of the country would be formed into an Igbo Republic.

The Coastal Eastern groups could get their own country - or two different ones if needed.

The Western part of the country in the south would be formed into a Yoruba Republic.

The Midwestern part of the country, in the south, could be formed into two states.

Overall, probably seven or nine states.
I don't know much about your situation but Nigeria seems a functioning country to me. I think that Hausa run Nigeria. Yes, I know about Boko Haram and about Biafra war in a past.

Kongo or ex Zaire is a non state in my opinion. Much more than Nigeria.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,333
Florania
#43
Different ethnic groups mostly lived in their own communities or states except in cases where some sort of political integration was occurring either through warfare and the subsequent deliberate assimilation of other groups into the ruling group's culture by members of that ruling group, or as a result of some earlier cultural fusion of compatible groups (usually through the adoption of a shared language).

Much of Africa, like much of Europe was not some cosmopolitan jumble everywhere. Yes there were some places or sub-regions that were much more mixed up, but that wasn't really the rule and ethnic groups mostly had definite areas that they were located in.



The exact same process took place in parts of Africa though. Cases like the Gonja in northern Ghana, the Itsekiri in southern Nigeria, the Mende in Sierra Leone, etc are cases of fusion of ethnic groups. But in those cases an actual cultural synthesis occurred over time. They weren't all just crammed into one community or state overnight before a shared culture developed.

As for Switzerland, sure, but wars against outsiders may have played a role in unifying them as one people. Also if one can talk of Swizterland's unity then one can also look at the issues that Belgium has had with division or tribalism along linguistic lines.

The "stability of European countries" also occurred after wars that cost many, many lives, and one of the biggest issues involved in these wars was ethnic nationalism.
A few things are problematic for the Africans:
Currently, most African languages are relatively local and monolingual Africans aren't likely to communicate with outsiders; should there be a common language?
I mentioned that some of these groups formed kingdoms or empires; do they have experiences with contemporary governance?
What is the future of their livelihoods?
Successful state building is a complicated job.
 
May 2017
141
Monterrey
#44
A few things are problematic for the Africans:
Currently, most African languages are relatively local and monolingual Africans aren't likely to communicate with outsiders; should there be a common language?
I mentioned that some of these groups formed kingdoms or empires; do they have experiences with contemporary governance?
What is the future of their livelihoods?
Successful state building is a complicated job.
Colonial languages seem quite widespread though. I don't have any statistics but the few people I've met who are originally from African countries have spoken either French or English; usually both.
 

Ighayere

Ad Honorem
Jul 2012
2,570
Benin City, Nigeria
#45
A few things are problematic for the Africans:
Currently, most African languages are relatively local and monolingual Africans aren't likely to communicate with outsiders; should there be a common language?
I mentioned that some of these groups formed kingdoms or empires; do they have experiences with contemporary governance?
What is the future of their livelihoods?
Successful state building is a complicated job.
In eastern Africa, Swahili is used a common language in multiple countries. In other parts of the continent south of the Sahara besides east Africa, I don't think some sort of common language situation will arise. Probably the closest parallel to the popularity of Swahili would be the use of Hausa in northern Nigeria and part of Niger, and the use of Wolof as a common language in Senegal, but this isn't on the same scale as Swahili is used.