Should governments build more public housing?

Should governments build more public housing?

  • Yes, they should.

    Votes: 21 44.7%
  • No, they should not.

    Votes: 17 36.2%
  • Undecided.

    Votes: 9 19.1%

  • Total voters
    47

Jake10

Ad Honoris
Oct 2010
11,960
Canada
Should more public housing projects be added to the ones that already exist? Why/Why not?
 

Menshevik

Ad Honorem
Dec 2012
9,364
here
When I think of "government housing," I think of the projects, aka the ghetto. I fail to see what good has ever come of the construction of those buildings.
 
Aug 2016
136
Virginia
Housing has to be affordable. Poor housing has consequences which affect everyone. Whether it is the direct effects of mold and insects to longer term consequences which affect productivity such as stress. The large projects of the past haven't always worked well. (But some were successful.) Requiring that developers put in a certain number of affordable homes in more expensive developments has not worked well.

But public housing was never originally intended to be permanent housing. That changed and when coupled with the neglect of the 1970's - poorly-run, poorly-financed developments marked by areas suffering from middle-class flight, they failed.
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,888
Western Eurasia
where, which government? in some European cities flat and renting prices became crazy high... there some state intervention in the market would maybe make some sense. if the best is to build new houses or other support or regulative ways i don't know. But the current situation is reaching the point here when it is harming the flow of workforce (in county x there is high unemployment and estates worth nothin, in county y there is a demand on workers but estates or renting are insanely expensive...) also i feel sorry for many young people and couples who can't move away from their parents due to the prices they won't be able to ever afford (and that also has a bigger social effect, maybe one of the reasons for the aging population...)

most urban people in central and eastern europe still live in state built former council houses i believe, though ownership changed since the fall of the communism, overwhelming majority of them became privatized and no longer council owned (maybe there were also same projects in Scandinavia? i don't know)
and no, the country was/is not a big ghetto, there are many middle class block house areas from them.
 

Space Shark

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
3,474
Redneck Country, AKA Texas
Housing has to be affordable. Poor housing has consequences which affect everyone. Whether it is the direct effects of mold and insects to longer term consequences which affect productivity such as stress. The large projects of the past haven't always worked well. (But some were successful.) Requiring that developers put in a certain number of affordable homes in more expensive developments has not worked well.

But public housing was never originally intended to be permanent housing. That changed and when coupled with the neglect of the 1970's - poorly-run, poorly-financed developments marked by areas suffering from middle-class flight, they failed.
This. The success of public housing largely depends on a variety of factors.
 

Jake10

Ad Honoris
Oct 2010
11,960
Canada
When I think of "government housing," I think of the projects, aka the ghetto. I fail to see what good has ever come of the construction of those buildings.
Drug dealers try to make their homes there. Since they don't have official incomes, they get in, and then they try to market their product to youth from broken homes. Such youth are more vulnerable, and a vicious cycle goes from there.
 

Jake10

Ad Honoris
Oct 2010
11,960
Canada
Housing has to be affordable. Poor housing has consequences which affect everyone. Whether it is the direct effects of mold and insects to longer term consequences which affect productivity such as stress. The large projects of the past haven't always worked well. (But some were successful.) Requiring that developers put in a certain number of affordable homes in more expensive developments has not worked well.

But public housing was never originally intended to be permanent housing. That changed and when coupled with the neglect of the 1970's - poorly-run, poorly-financed developments marked by areas suffering from middle-class flight, they failed.
Yes, public housing was intended to be temporary, but we, now, see cases of people who live there, and their parents lived there, and it seems as if their kids will live there. I think there should be a limit on the number of years people can live there, especially if they're young.
 

Lord Oda Nobunaga

Ad Honorem
Jan 2015
5,635
Ontario, Canada
No. Waste of money on an area which will just become a ghetto or worse, no one actually goes to live there. In other words a wasted investment of people's tax money.
 

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,684
Affordable housing is essential to have a functioning society,

The market generally has failed to provide it.

It can be done properly.
 

athena

Ad Honorem
Jan 2010
5,032
Eugene, Oregon
When I think of "government housing," I think of the projects, aka the ghetto. I fail to see what good has ever come of the construction of those buildings.
Okay, have you attempted to image how things would be if there were no public housing?

Everywhere cities are announcing a housing crisis. If I had to move today I would be in crisis because there is no other housing I can afford. I would be homeless and because I use a machine that keeps breathing through the night, my ability to function would be seriously compromised.

My understanding of homelessness is that it makes people disfunctional, and puts them in a life threatening situation. I think it is unrealistic to expect homeless people to function, hold jobs and do all the things that are required. Homelessness is extremely harmful to children and a modern civilized country should not turn a blind eye to the problem. Not only is it harmful to the children, but humans keep breeding and such problems increase expotentially.

Say you have a disability income of $741 a month. How many rentals are there for you to choose from in your area?