Should Poland pay reparations to Germany?

Status
Closed
Sep 2007
121
athens,greece
#3
How many compensations must Germany pay, I wonder...I absolutely agree with Dr. Realism. No doubt time has been hard for the Germans, as well, but it is different.

I visited Poland, two years ago, due to a cultural-exchange university project, I made some Polish friends, I have read a lot about the Warsaw Uprising. Of course, nothing is black or white, and in all cases of violence- especially wars-, victims exist on both sides, but I consider the move of the group provocative and ahistorical, to say the least.

Dr. Realism's point was perfect, in my opinion. This is the price we pay, when our countries decide to destroy other nations' freedom.
 
Jul 2006
1,315
Hellas
#4
Polands fault, Poland should throw flowers not handgranades to the German "liberators".

Of course i am joking.
I agree Amalia and Dr.
 

Belisarius

Forum Staff
Jun 2006
10,359
U.K.
#6
Interesting response, and to be honest, I thought much along the same lines when I found this. However, most of Europe is in the E. U. now and the war has been over for 50 years or so. Over this time there have been many “apologies” made for one reason or another, so isn’t it time to move on?

In a democracy, the minority subordinates its will to that of the majority. Therefore everyone in a democracy bears responsibility for the actions of the governments they elect to a greater or lesser extent. It can be argued that in the Germany of the 30’s and 40’s, the minority imposed a dictatorship on the majority, which was then brutalised into acquiescence with the regime. Should they then be forced to bear the responsibility for the actions of the minority?

What about ethnic Germans, living in Czechoslovakia, Poland, Russia, etc. who had nothing at all to do with this dictatorship but became pawns in a political game, should they be dispossessed without any recompense?
 
Jul 2007
1,674
Australia
#7
Interesting response, and to be honest, I thought much along the same lines when I found this. However, most of Europe is in the E. U. now and the war has been over for 50 years or so. Over this time there have been many “apologies” made for one reason or another, so isn’t it time to move on?

I would tend to agree - but on the other hand, some events are so engraved on the "history" or "identity" of a nation, and despite the fact that these events were over 50 years ago, they still occurred within the "current" generation of many people. Thus, these memories may still be very fresh and very relevant, regardless of them occurring half a lifetime ago.
 
Sep 2007
121
athens,greece
#8
I would tend to agree - but on the other hand, some events are so engraved on the "history" or "identity" of a nation, and despite the fact that these events were over 50 years ago, they still occurred within the "current" generation of many people. Thus, these memories may still be very fresh and very relevant, regardless of them occurring half a lifetime ago.


Exactly. I must confess I am divided in this. I partly agree with Belisarius. There were many, many people who had nothing to do with the abominable violence, as I said, nothing is black or white.

However, I do agree with Melisende, as well. Some things simply cannot be forgotten. I am not stating that this is right or wrong, but these are human feelings. And Melisende is right when saying that the memories are strong still, there are many surviving witnesses.

Oddly, I think both opinions are correct.
 
May 2007
1,755
Australia
#9
Interesting response, and to be honest, I thought much along the same lines when I found this. However, most of Europe is in the E. U. now and the war has been over for 50 years or so. Over this time there have been many “apologies” made for one reason or another, so isn’t it time to move on?

In a democracy, the minority subordinates its will to that of the majority. Therefore everyone in a democracy bears responsibility for the actions of the governments they elect to a greater or lesser extent. It can be argued that in the Germany of the 30’s and 40’s, the minority imposed a dictatorship on the majority, which was then brutalised into acquiescence with the regime. Should they then be forced to bear the responsibility for the actions of the minority?

What about ethnic Germans, living in Czechoslovakia, Poland, Russia, etc. who had nothing at all to do with this dictatorship but became pawns in a political game, should they be dispossessed without any recompense?
I had a brother in law that was German and as a young boy was a pawn in the political game. He along with his family was in some type of work camp because they did not join the regime. They did not ask for this dictatorship to rule them and eventually cause there deaths. But this is what happens in war.
From what my brother in law told me a lot of the strife in Germany was caused by the apologies made by Germany after the WW1 with parts of the country partitioned off from their own people. This may be wrong, but it is how I remember him telling me about it.
My brother in law came to Australia with nothing, knocked on the doors of factories and asked "have you got a job for me boss" worked hard and eventually died a very wealthy man. He moved on from these terrible experiences of war.
After so much time I too think the time for apologies are now over and we should learn from the past not reawaken it.
 
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