Should the roman army be placed in the Guinness book of world records?

Jan 2013
1,207
Anywhere
No army nor military has lasted so long as none other than the roman army,which served the roman kingdom, roman republic, roman empire/eastern(byzantine) roman empire. Do you believe they should be part of it?
 

Isoroku295

Ad Honorem
Jan 2009
8,488
In the Past
Personally, no. It has just had too many different forms, and honestly, the nation it fought for could be divided into numerous historical nations. Honestly we could technically consider the Egyptian army to have lasted longer, depending on your definition of lasted.
 

Majasprat

Ad Honorem
Feb 2014
2,009
Canada BC
... No?

The army evolved greatly throughout time. The Roman Kingdom's military was nothing like the Roman Empire's.

Also, I don't think Guinness World Records accepts historical things...
 

Isoroku295

Ad Honorem
Jan 2009
8,488
In the Past
... No?

The army evolved greatly throughout time. The Roman Kingdom's military was nothing like the Roman Empire's.

Also, I don't think Guinness World Records accepts historical things...
One could say that the Roman Kingdom didn't even have a military. Just levies when they were needed. Same for about 3/4ths the Republic. Also, one could (very loosely) say that it was a new military after every civil war where the rebelling side won. But again, that's a VERY loose definition of continuity.

Do we consider the Byzantine army to be the same as the Roman Republics later armies? At what point did they become seperate?

There are too many things to consider for us to reasonably consider it the same military.
 

Majasprat

Ad Honorem
Feb 2014
2,009
Canada BC
One could say that the Roman Kingdom didn't even have a military. Just levies when they were needed. Same for about 3/4ths the Republic. Also, one could (very loosely) say that it was a new military after every civil war where the rebelling side won. But again, that's a VERY loose definition of continuity.

Do we consider the Byzantine army to be the same as the Roman Republics later armies? At what point did they become seperate?

There are too many things to consider for us to reasonably consider it the same military.
Yes, I'm aware they didn't really have a standing military but they did have a military when needed.
 

johnincornwall

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,867
Cornwall
I dont see the point of the question Azarius. It's fairly juvenile and doesn't enhance knowledge of the Roman Empire and it's derivatives - of which there is a great deal on here.
 

Isoroku295

Ad Honorem
Jan 2009
8,488
In the Past
I dont see the point of the question Azarius. It's fairly juvenile and doesn't enhance knowledge of the Roman Empire and it's derivatives - of which there is a great deal on here.
Not every thread here is about enhancing knowledge, nor need it be.
 

caldrail

Ad Honorem
Feb 2012
5,330
There was no Roman army until the late empire. Prior to that, legions were 'packets' of military power handed to politicians to enable their control of territory. Where you see the sources talk about 'our army', they simply meant the sum total of force without reference to any headquarters structure, which did not exist at that time. The original question is perhaps attempting to establish a modern aspect to the legions in order to qualify. That would be incorrect. So no. No record book entry for the Roman legions is really justified.
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,385
Italy, Lago Maggiore
There was no Roman army until the late empire. Prior to that, legions were 'packets' of military power handed to politicians to enable their control of territory. Where you see the sources talk about 'our army', they simply meant the sum total of force without reference to any headquarters structure, which did not exist at that time. The original question is perhaps attempting to establish a modern aspect to the legions in order to qualify. That would be incorrect. So no. No record book entry for the Roman legions is really justified.
Technically you're right, Ancient Romans talked about legions, often specifying which legion stayed with which leader. Not rarely the leader of a legion became also a political leader.

In case of war the main question was: how many legions can we have on our side?