Should the U.S. have tried getting more Caribbean territories in the early 20th century?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
14,253
SoCal
#11
I can't remember but do you regard European Colonialism in general as 'territory opportunities'? Or does this only apply to the appetite of the US for swallowing up other people's properties (mainly Mexico and Spain)
BTW, I want to make a point here--the U.S. actually appears to have acquired more territory from both France (Louisiana) and Russia (Alaska) than it did from Spain (Florida). Personally, I think that it's a great idea for countries to take up other countries on offers to sell some of their territory. Indeed, it would be even better if, after this territory was purchased, this territory would have been flooded with settlers from the home country in order to significantly increase the likelihood that there wouldn't be a mass movement for secession in this territory later on. In this regard, the U.S. appears to have had an advantage over countries such as France since the U.S. appears to have had much more settlers to spare for this purpose.
 
Nov 2011
8,787
The Dustbin, formerly, Garden of England
#12
As for France being unwilling to grant independence to its smaller colonies, I was under the impression that there is no large-scale demand for independence in most of France's smaller colonies. Am I wrong in regards to this? I know that France was willing to allow New Caledonia to hold an independence referendum recently--an independence referendum whose outcome was a majority of voters in favor of continued French rule! If the New Caledonians aren't that eager to get independence from France, are you sure that the people in France's other small colonies actually want independence?
I think that the French have largely bought off many inhabitants of overseas territories with Metropolitan France level welfare and social security benefits and a good amount of investment. The only one that I have actually been to, La Reunion, the locals (French ones, not creoles) boasted about it comparing how much better off they were than Mauritians--the place though is, for a visitor, dramatically more expensive than Mauritius.
New Caledonia is special case, there have been referendums on independence in the past and they have the right to demand new ones in the near future and the gossip is that the French Government "orchestrated" the one held last year--independence is not going away. Not all of the territories could stand on their own anyway and I just remembered that the sneaky French have pulled of a cunning stroke---these territories are "Departments of France" and therefore part of the EU--they even send MEPs to the European Parliament! This allows them to claim products of the territories as "Product of France" and import, for instance bananas and sugar tariff free while whacking 176Euros/ton and 339Euros/ton respectively on "MFN third party" goods--Bastards!
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
14,253
SoCal
#13
I think that the French have largely bought off many inhabitants of overseas territories with Metropolitan France level welfare and social security benefits and a good amount of investment. The only one that I have actually been to, La Reunion, the locals (French ones, not creoles) boasted about it comparing how much better off they were than Mauritians--the place though is, for a visitor, dramatically more expensive than Mauritius.
Yeah, that makes sense. After all, when life is comfortable, the odds are probably higher that you'd be consent with the status quo. This also might be why there is no large-scale movement in favor of independence in either Puerto Rico or the U.S. Virgin Islands. Likewise, this might also help explain why there is no large-scale secessionist movement among U.S. Blacks and Hispanics.

New Caledonia is special case, there have been referendums on independence in the past and they have the right to demand new ones in the near future and the gossip is that the French Government "orchestrated" the one held last year--independence is not going away.
Are you suggesting that the results of the last referendum were rigged?

Not all of the territories could stand on their own anyway and I just remembered that the sneaky French have pulled of a cunning stroke---these territories are "Departments of France" and therefore part of the EU--they even send MEPs to the European Parliament! This allows them to claim products of the territories as "Product of France" and import, for instance bananas and sugar tariff free while whacking 176Euros/ton and 339Euros/ton respectively on "MFN third party" goods--Bastards!
Has anyone ever complained about this?