Should there be international laws for drone use?

Oct 2015
957
Norway
I'm thinking of the military use of drones, both for surveilance and bombing, This will only become more and more common and an international framework would be useful. Should flying a drone into another country's airspace be considered an act of war? Who is responsible for what a drone that's advanced enough to make desicions on its own does? Should a killer drone ever be allowed to decide when to fire?

What do you think?
 

constantine

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
8,545
I'm thinking of the military use of drones, both for surveilance and bombing, This will only become more and more common and an international framework would be useful. Should flying a drone into another country's airspace be considered an act of war? Who is responsible for what a drone that's advanced enough to make desicions on its own does? Should a killer drone ever be allowed to decide when to fire?

What do you think?
I think nation-states can handle their own laws for drone use; international law is a farce anyway, the strong will always do as they please. Plus, the United States isn't likely to agree to any treaty that places restrictions on them and since the US is at the forefront of this new technology, the issue is moot.

But, ultimately, I don't see how it is in our interest. Democracies have long been disadvantaged in waging war compared to dictatorships on account of domestic political considerations; automation offers the prospect of giving democracies the same flexibility as dictatorships by removing many of these constraints. They also seem to have the added benefit of reducing the cost for deployments since unmanned systems are, on average, less expensive than manned systems. Given the global scale of the United States' obligations and responsibilities, this force multiplier is a highly welcome innovation.

Oh, flying a drone into another country and violating their airspace is an act of war. But it's generally the US doing this against far weaker countries who have no desire to escalate the confrontation by invoking their full rights of territorial sovereignty and declaring war upon the United States in response...it probably wouldn't end very well for them if they did.
 
Apr 2016
1,646
United Kingdom
I think nation-states can handle their own laws for drone use; international law is a farce anyway, the strong will always do as they please. Plus, the United States isn't likely to agree to any treaty that places restrictions on them and since the US is at the forefront of this new technology, the issue is moot
Entirely this.
 
Feb 2016
5,049
Atlantic Ocean
I think nation-states can handle their own laws for drone use; international law is a farce anyway, the strong will always do as they please. Plus, the United States isn't likely to agree to any treaty that places restrictions on them and since the US is at the forefront of this new technology, the issue is moot.

But, ultimately, I don't see how it is in our interest. Democracies have long been disadvantaged in waging war compared to dictatorships on account of domestic political considerations; automation offers the prospect of giving democracies the same flexibility as dictatorships by removing many of these constraints. They also seem to have the added benefit of reducing the cost for deployments since unmanned systems are, on average, less expensive than manned systems. Given the global scale of the United States' obligations and responsibilities, this force multiplier is a highly welcome innovation.

Oh, flying a drone into another country and violating their airspace is an act of war. But it's generally the US doing this against far weaker countries who have no desire to escalate the confrontation by invoking their full rights of territorial sovereignty and declaring war upon the United States in response...it probably wouldn't end very well for them if they did.
+1 i agree as well