Significant Works of Historical Art and Craftsmanship

Aug 2019
43
Livingston 62° 38′ 27″ S, 60° 22′ 0.98″ W
Vrana Palace (Bulgarian is a former royal palace, on the outskirts of Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria. It is today the official residence of former Tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria and his wife Margarita. While the Royal Palace in the center of Sofia (today the National Art Gallery and the National Ethnographic Museum) served representative purposes and the Euxinograd Palace near Varna was a summer residence, Vrana was the palace where the royal family of Bulgaria spent most of their time. 30073034_1619111538206422_8450055685628818098_o-768x576.jpg
 
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Aug 2019
43
Livingston 62° 38′ 27″ S, 60° 22′ 0.98″ W
The former Prince / Imperial Palace and the current complex of national museums in Sofia is located on Prince Alexander I Square in the center of the capital of Bulgaria. The palace currently houses 2 national museums:
National Art Gallery - in the northwestern part;
National Ethnographic Museum - in the southeast. IMGP3174.jpg
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,022
SoCal
Here is the grave of Samuel Tilden (the Al Gore of his day--he extremely narrowly lost the 1876 US presidential election in spite of winning the popular vote):





And here is Chester Arthur's grave:

 
Feb 2019
774
Pennsylvania, US
Is this painting supported to have a homoerotic component to it?
I think that any sort of suggestiveness about the image is more the outcome of a modern interpretation of what is/is not acceptable for male to male affection/friendship... it seems from stories like that of the intensity of his relationship with Nur Jahan that he would have been heterosexual.

This image is communicating something about the power of an individual over another. Jahangir on the right is shown as the most powerful man - he stands on a lion, is taller and more upright in his posture and seems to dominate this embrace. Shah Abbas, in his posture and lower arm level is here being shown as much less powerful than Jahangir - even the lamb that he stands on appears to have been pushed back out into a smaller area/ uncomfortable position by the lion. The reality is that these men never met - the image is an illustration of a dream. The symbols are there to indicate peaceful brotherhood between the two; but there is also a whole lot of propaganda happening here indicating that Jahangir is the greater man.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,022
SoCal
I think that any sort of suggestiveness about the image is more the outcome of a modern interpretation of what is/is not acceptable for male to male affection/friendship... it seems from stories like that of the intensity of his relationship with Nur Jahan that he would have been heterosexual.

This image is communicating something about the power of an individual over another. Jahangir on the right is shown as the most powerful man - he stands on a lion, is taller and more upright in his posture and seems to dominate this embrace. Shah Abbas, in his posture and lower arm level is here being shown as much less powerful than Jahangir - even the lamb that he stands on appears to have been pushed back out into a smaller area/ uncomfortable position by the lion. The reality is that these men never met - the image is an illustration of a dream. The symbols are there to indicate peaceful brotherhood between the two; but there is also a whole lot of propaganda happening here indicating that Jahangir is the greater man.
That makes sense; thanks for this explanation! :)