Similarities Between Cultures and Warrior/Heroic Virtues

Jan 2019
11
CA, U.S.A.
I have recently been re-reading the Iliad and delving into articles regarding the virtues/code of Homeric heroes. All the while I’m starting to see some form of broad connections between the heroes of Homer’s world and those of other cultures, such as Scandinavian Vikings and Arjuna in the Bhagavad Gita. I would throw medieval knights into the mix, but I don’t believe their value systems are entirely congruent with those of Homeric heroes. What other cultures have you noticed that might share similar ideals of individualistic warriors?
 
Aug 2019
571
North
I might be wrong, but it seems to me that the norse pantheon was to a degree influenced by the romans via other germanics. Maybe our viking @Runa :) could elaborate on that.
 
Nov 2018
365
Denmark
I might be wrong, but it seems to me that the norse pantheon was to a degree influenced by the romans via other germanics. Maybe our viking @Runa :) could elaborate on that.
Thanks for the confidence.:)
Most likely the similarities between the pantheons come from a common origin.
Not that the Romans cannot have influenced the Scandinavians directly and indirectly through both gift diplomacy and returning mercenaries, which have brought new ideas with them.
Some have a theory that Freyja is inspired by Isis and Freyja’s cat-drawn carriage is probably inspired by Kybele’s lion-drawn carriage.
kybele 2.jpg
Nevertheless, having to survive in a hostile world, where you never knew when your neighbors got the bright idea to ambush you to rob women and livestock, would also cause people to develop similar characteristics, no matter where in the world they live.
In addition, a common origin from a nomadic warrior people would again be able to explain the similarities in mentality.
People do not change so quickly unless, for example if they change their worldview through a change of religion. And it wasn't exactly because Christianity turned Europeans into a bunch of peace-loving hippies.
Therefore, I think we can compare the Knights with the other peoples. They also lived in a world where the power of the state was weak and it was only just about to take over the monopoly of violence.
Therefore, they also had to be tough and fearless if they wanted to survive. Funny enough if I remember correctly, neither the Homeric heroes nor the knights had trouble crying as women.
Where the Romans and the Scandinavians' if my memory is correct, looked differently at that kind of effeminate behavior.
 
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Nov 2019
84
Bylanuelde,Alemannia
I used to think scandinavians origins are in the the east now i think they are to be found in the west.For example Thors Hammer which everybody knows to be a mythological weapon with extraordinary Features and made in Asgard once used by Odin i think and then given to his son Thor.There are several forms of the Hammer (i´ve forgotten the Name of it) but one form draws my Attention ,it s from a iceland statue Thors Hammer
also Thor doesnt realy look like a scandinavian with this conical hat but i want to pay Attention to the hammer and this saddle of twaregs Tuareg saddle - RAND AFRICAN ART
This crossform is used by them to be protected on journeys and they weare amulets also in crossforms Tuareg Crosses - AMAZIGH.
 

Menshevik

Ad Honorem
Dec 2012
9,391
here
I have recently been re-reading the Iliad and delving into articles regarding the virtues/code of Homeric heroes. All the while I’m starting to see some form of broad connections between the heroes of Homer’s world and those of other cultures, such as Scandinavian Vikings and Arjuna in the Bhagavad Gita. I would throw medieval knights into the mix, but I don’t believe their value systems are entirely congruent with those of Homeric heroes. What other cultures have you noticed that might share similar ideals of individualistic warriors?
FWIW, there’s a theory that the Trojan War took place somewhere in Scandinavia/Northern Europe. If that’s true (not saying it is) it could be a possible explanation regarding these similarities. It’s a fun (and maybe crackpot) idea. If you want a link just ask.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,346
Sydney
Barbarians and feudal culture have a strong emphasis on men displaying heroic deed
it raise their prestige and make their family more honorable
it's a pain for the commander when on the battlefield when Celtic ,ancient Greeks, Japanese or Papuan warriors stride forward , reel out their pedigree and challenge anyone to come to fight them one on one

they are warriors ....not soldiers and obey only when they wish
 
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Aug 2019
571
North
Barbarians and feudal culture have a strong emphasis on men displaying heroic deed
it raise their prestige and make their family more honorable
it's a pain for the commander when on the battlefield when Celtic ,ancient Greeks, Japanese or Papuan warriors stride forward , reel out their pedigree and challenge anyone to come to fight them one on one

they are warriors ....not soldiers and obey only when they wish
Not quite. Thessalians and the rest of achaians are mentioned in the Iliad to each one have chosen a hero to fight for one and the other side, respectively, instead of engaging the both armies to fight and thus inflict unnecessary casualties.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,346
Sydney
there was this big thing that the standing of the contestant had to match
for a famous warrior to fight a nobody would be a great shame
on the one on one , David an Goliath totally unbelievable
there is no way a prime warrior would have accepted to fight a bare arsed kid
 
Aug 2019
571
North
there was this big thing that the standing of the contestant had to match
for a famous warrior to fight a nobody would be a great shame
on the one on one , David an Goliath totally unbelievable
there is no way a prime warrior would have accepted to fight a bare arsed kid
Maybe it was because the both were arian
/philistine on the one side (goliath) and jew (david) on the other.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,346
Sydney
Jews are not Aryans as far as I know and Philistines probably not either

or maybe I misunderstand ...... both were agrarians