Slaves brought into sub-saharan africa

Dec 2013
94
Planet Earth
#11
All the ones I've ever known don't consider themselves black
It's an American thing. I discovered only after studying English about this weird thing (some horners that pretend to be tanned whites lol). It's a psychological reaction to an ambient with an high rate of racism, leave it to America and don't bring it to African ambients, thank you.

I don't know what America will say when it will discover the West Africans with hooked noses, or when they'll discover about the Rwandan and Ugandans with an horner look LOL.
 
Last edited:
Mar 2013
1,441
Escandinavia y Mesopotamia
#12
Recently I have had the topic slavery and imperialism at the auditorium. I did not read nor hear about specific demand of foreign slaves in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Until ca 1750 throughout the Sudanic Savanna the majority of populations were animists. Often the Muslim rulers shared some elements of the native religions and thus did not try to convert them or enforce Islamic law. From around 1700 a powerful Islamic revival to forcefully convert their non-Muslim subjects started until it was halted by European Imperialism at the end of 1800.

The most important of these revivalist states was the Sokoto caliphate. Islam had always approved of slavery for Non-Mulims, and the jihads created a new slaving frontier on the basis of rejuvenated Islam. Sokoto caliphate in 1900 had at least 1 million population and ca 2.5 million slaves.

In East Africa Islam expanded merely thanks to Sayyid Said, the imam of Oman. Later Sayyid Said moved his capital to Zanzibar in 1840 together with his Pakistani mercenaries. Here he gained control of the Swahili east coast and started a systematically shipments of slaves to Arabia and Ottoman Empire.

As I wrote initially: I did not read nor hear about specific demand of foreign slaves in Sub-Saharan Africa.

However I remember I read for some months ago about an Muslim Arabian ruler in what today is Morocco or Algeria, where he had an European slave army and defeated a Muslim African empire, but I don’t remember the name exactly from memory.
Now I got it: it was the Sultanate of Morocco who ended the Songhai Empire in 1591 with an army of 3000 slaves, where many of them were Europeans equipped with muskets.
 

Ichon

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,654
#13
All the ones I've ever known don't consider themselves black
I worked with several Ethiopians a couple years ago and there is a big Ethiopian community near where I live and from those I met they don't consider themselves 'black' in the sense of American blacks but they aren't pretending to be white either. They feel Ethiopian separate from racial attitudes in the U.S. though most are recent immigrants so maybe those who have lived in U.S. longer feel the racism more and chose to identify differently. One of the girls I worked with had a sister with very light skin and hooked nose- many people thought she was Latina but she hated that... marred some basketball player last I heard but she was proud to be Ethiopian and really got mad whenever someone tried to speak Spanish to her.
 
Mar 2014
336
Carthage
#14
And I have talked to an Ethiopian girl, light skin, muslim, referred to herself as Black, and African like me who was Black but born in America. Though I was not African born and she was not African-American (descendant of West Africa) we still identified each other as both being African and Black. I've had all but one African refer to me as one of them. So maybe it depends on their experience. I had a West African girl, ethnically similar to me tell me I wasn't African. I told her I'm from West Africa, and she said were, I told her I was born here but she told me I'm American. So I think it depends.