Slovakian goverment paid Hitler to get rid of jews

Jul 2011
1,426
Sweden
#1
I find this very ironic and stumbled across this information yesterday when i was watching a documentary. According to this documentary The Slovakian goverment actually paid the nazis 500 marks for each jew they transported away from Slovakia. The nazis only wanted the men for labour force but the slovakian goverment insisted that the nazis also took the families with them.

German and Slovak authorities deported about 70,000 Jews from Slovakia; about 65,000 of them were murdered or died in concentration camps. The overall figures are inexact, partly because many Jews did not identify themselves, but one 2006 estimate is that approximately 105,000 Slovak Jews, or 77% of their pre-war population, died during the war.



Auschwitz: The Nazis and 'The Final Solution' - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

[ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wannsee_Conference]Wannsee Conference - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]

Slovak Republic (1939?45) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

diddyriddick

Historum Emeritas
May 2009
14,692
A tiny hamlet in the Carolina Sandhills
#2
Sorry if I'm being daft, but I'm not sure where you're going here. Slovakia was effectively a Nazi-conquered territory. States in such a position have paid their conquerors tribute since the beginning of time. It's just that relatively recently the accountants have gotten involved.
 
Apr 2010
16,748
Slovakia
#3
Slovakia was de facto German protectorate. That said Slovak government was happy to get rid of at last part of Jewish population. Jews were considered back then by many as a economic and social burden because lot of them engaged in usury and alcohol production and distribution. Often combination of both. This was particularly damaging to farmers in the countryside and contributed to widespread poverty.

However deportations of Slovak Jews have to be viewed in light of the fact that Germans told Slovak authorities Jews will be resettled (in Poland). It was not known to Slovak government that those Jews are transported for extermination. That's reason Slovak government insisted on transporting whole families -so that they stay together.

Transports started in 1942 but once existence and purpose of concentration camps in Poland became known (or suspected) the same year, Slovakia stooped all further Jewish transports regardless of German protests. They were not renewed until Germans occupied Slovakia in 1944 after defeat of Slovak uprising.

More info here:

[ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Slovakia"]History of the Jews in Slovakia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]
 
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Jul 2011
1,426
Sweden
#4
Sorry if I'm being daft, but I'm not sure where you're going here. Slovakia was effectively a Nazi-conquered territory. States in such a position have paid their conquerors tribute since the beginning of time. It's just that relatively recently the accountants have gotten involved.
I find it ironic that the slovakian goverment paid the nazis to get rid of slovakian jews including their families. Not that they had to get rid of them like in other places in occupied territories of Nazi German.
 
Apr 2010
16,748
Slovakia
#5
I find it ironic that the slovakian goverment paid the nazis to get rid of slovakian jews including their families. Not that they had to get rid of them like in other places in occupied territories of Nazi German.
It's ironic only in retrospect. Germans did not made their program of extermination public. It was not know what is happening to Jews until late in war and whole thing did not became evident before first camps and sites of atrocities were liberated.

Slovak Jews were transported as a substitute for Slovak workers and Germans demanded compensation. It was pretty logical under circumstances. Slovakia was subjected to all sorts of disadvantageous economic conditions as Germans tried to extract as much resources from Slovakia as possible.
 
Mar 2013
161
UK
#6
Sorry if I'm being daft, but I'm not sure where you're going here. Slovakia was effectively a Nazi-conquered territory. States in such a position have paid their conquerors tribute since the beginning of time. It's just that relatively recently the accountants have gotten involved.
Bullshit, Slovakia was NOT a Nazi-conquered territory but a fascist state led by Josef Tiso. Slovakia began the deportation of Jews in 1942 without any "German help". The fascist Slovak state "successfully" got rid of its entire Jewish population (estimations between 70 000 and 105 000 victims)
 
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diddyriddick

Historum Emeritas
May 2009
14,692
A tiny hamlet in the Carolina Sandhills
#7
Bullshit, Slovakia was NOT a Nazi-conquered territory but a fascist state led by Josef Tiso. Slovakia began the deportation of Jews in 1942 without any "German help". The fascist Slovak state "successfully" got rid of its entire Jewish population (estimations between 70 000 and 105 000 victims)
Posting questionable history is your privilege. Using offensive language is not. You have been warned before here for your behavior and apparently didn't take it to heart. If you can't play nicely, then perhaps it's time to find another sandbox.

I HIGHLY recommend that you familiarize yourself with our rules.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
33,666
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#8
I find it ironic that the slovakian goverment paid the nazis to get rid of slovakian jews including their families. Not that they had to get rid of them like in other places in occupied territories of Nazi German.
I don't see why it's ironic, unless you mean the Nazis should have paid the Slovakians? The Nazis probably put it to the Slovakians that they had to bear the cost of "resettlement", unless they were willing to do it themselves.
 
Jul 2011
1,426
Sweden
#9
I don't see why it's ironic, unless you mean the Nazis should have paid the Slovakians? The Nazis probably put it to the Slovakians that they had to bear the cost of "resettlement", unless they were willing to do it themselves.
So why would the slovakian goverment choose to pay the german nazis for deporting jews as "slave labour" instead of sending slovakian workers that would get paid as agreed upon from the start?
 
Jan 2013
5,835
Canberra, Australia
#10
I think it high time to introduce some sober analysis into this discussion. To that end, this is what is written on this topic in the book "Auschwitz: 1270 to the Present", by Van Pelt and Dwork.

Page 299 ff:
Having received full authority over the Final Solution, and with that over all of Europe's Jewry, Himmler was now free to dispatch Jews to take the place of the Soviet prisoners of war. Although he did not specify which camps would be affected [in his telegram of 26 January 1942 to Richard Gluecks, the Inspector of Concentration Camps], in only two were Soviets an essential part of the planned inmate population: Auschwitz and Majdanek. But while the idea to replace prisoners of war with Jews worked in principle, Himmler's initial plan to dispatch German Jews immediately for that purpose was not practicable. As it transpired, the immediate deportation of 150,000 Jews from the Reich and the Protectorate of Bohemia-Moravia was difficult from an organisational point of view. There were also delays due to the official procedures for the transfer of German Jewish property to the Reich. Himmler's telegram was premature. German Jews could not take the place of the Soviets. If a quick fix were to be found for Himmler's problem in Auschwitz, he would have to find another group of Jews who could be quickly assembled and moved and who did not warrant the attention of German bureaucrats.

The Jews of Hitler's client state of Slovakia, ruled by the Fascist cleric Monsignor Dr Josef Tiso and the National Socialist professor Vojtech Tuka, fit the bill. As the Holocaust historian Yehuda Bauer has explained, in 1940 the German Government had compelled Tuka to agree to send 120,000 Slovak workers to the labour-strapped Reich. The Slovaks regretted this arrangement and dragged their feet. Finally, in the late summer of 1941, the Germans demanded the immediate transfer of 20,000 workers. Asked if they would take 20,000 Slovak Jews, the Germans declined. They were just beginning to deport all remaining Jews from the Reich.

Tiso and Tuka continued to hold out. In the hope that the Germans would be prepared to take Jews instead of Christians, they concentrated thousands of young Slovak Jews into three labour camps. In January 1942 they again offered the German Labour Ministry 20,000 strong, young Jews for work in Germany. Within days a response came in the form of Dieter Wisliceny. Officially an attaché at the German embassy in Bratislava, Wisliceny was in effect Eichmann's local agent. He had learned from Eichmann that Himmler needed Jews to replace the Soviet prisoners of war in Auschwitz, and he was instructed to accept the Slovak offer of 20,000 able-bodied Jews on Germany's behalf: 10,000 would be sent to Auschwitz and 10,000 to Majdanek. The deal was made official on 16 February [1942]. "As part of the measures for the Final Solution of the European Jewish Question, the German Government is prepared to take over 20,000 young, strong Slovak Jews immediately and to transport them to the East, where there is a need for labour", a senior official of the Foreign Office, Martin Luther, cabled the German legation in Bratislava. Tiso and Tuka were delighted.

..............................................................................................

The Slovak women [= Jewish unmarried women aged between 16 and 45, assembled and transported to Auschwitz on 27 March 1942] were destined for Birkenau, but there had been a delay in the Germans' building schedule. Birkenau officially had been in operation since the beginning of March, when the remaining Soviet prisoners of war, a group of German criminals, and 1200 sick male inmates from the lazaret had been moved to BA I, the area designated for the women. The transfer of the women to Birkenau had to wait; in the meantime they were packed into ten specially walled-off barracks in the base camp at Auschwitz.

...............................................................................

By the end of April ten Slovak transports had arrived and 9,655 Slovak Jews had been registered. None of the transports included old people or young children, and there were no selections on the train ramps.

[There follows a passage on the first gassings of Jews in Auschwitz, beginning in February 1942, first in the crematorium in the main camp which had been converted into a gas chamber, and then in a peasant cottage in the north-western part of Birkenau which had likewise been converted into two gas chambers, the so-called "little red house". These Jews had been sent from the Schmelt labour camps in Upper Silesia for "euthanasia" since they had become too sick and weak to work.]

The Slovaks, in the meantime, realised that when the 20,000 young Jews they had got the Germans to take left home, many families would have no breadwinner and would become a burden on the Slovak economy. Eichmann initially refused even to discuss the matter but, after the successful "special treatment" of the elderly Upper Silesian Jews, concluded that the same solution could be applied to Slovak Jews unable to work.

[There follows a passage on a visit to Auschwitz by Hans Kammler on 27 February 1942, as a result of which it was decided to build a new crematorium in Birkenau, near the "little red house".]

There is no doubt that Kammler's visit led to the Germans' reversal of their decision about the mass deportation of Slovak Jewry. Once Kammler had organised the construction of the crematorium in Birkenau, the Reich Security Main Office permitted the German Foreign Office to negotiate seriously. On 3 March [1942] Tuka announced to the Slovak State Council that, pending certain financial arrangements, the Germans had agreed to take the remaining 70,000 Jews. The Germans were doing them a favour and were to be compensated at the rate of 500 marks for every Jew deported. For this sum, however, the Slovak Government was guaranteed that "the Jews accepted as part of the dejudaisation of Slovakia will remain permanently in the Eastern Territories and will not be offered any possibility of re-0immigrating into Slovakia". the state was free to seize Jewish property left behind.

It took Eichmann another month to arrange the deportation of families. Several transports went to Lublin, where a selection took place just outside the station. Able-bodied men were marched to Majdanek; the "unfit for work" were forced back onto the train, which continued its journey to killing installations which Christian Wirth, the architect of the T4 gas chambers, had built at Belzec on Odilo Globocnik's instructions.

Throughout May and June [1942], no Slovak Jews were killed in Bunker 1 in Birkenau; all the victims were Upper Silesian Jews. With the destruction of these Jews, mass murder became a fixture of life in Auschwitz, but it was not yet the camp's primary purpose. The history of Bunker 1 was rooted in the well-established function of the camp as an execution ground for people convicted by the Gestapo court in Kattowitz. The deportation of the Schmelt Jews to Auschwitz was independent of the massive deportations overseen by Eichmann. It was, and remained, a local affair.