Small historical events that you are really fond of

Dec 2014
385
Wales
#52
The story of the Hudson Bay Company ship S.S. Baychimo. Caught in an ice-flow off Cape Barrow Canada in 1931, it was feared it was about to be crushed and sink, so the ship was abandoned to it's fate. However, the ship survived, and floated away. Without a human soul aboard it continued to sail around the arctic waters, becoming known as the “ghost ship of the Arctic”, with the last sighting being in 1969, 38 years after being abandoned. It's final fate is unknown, and as recently as 2006 attempts were being made to find out what had happened to it. This is an excellent short video about it.

 
Dec 2014
385
Wales
#54
Did this ship's crew flee this ship before it appeared like it was going to be crushed and sink?
The crew left the ship when it was first trapped in ice and made their way to safety, but returned to the ship when the ice began to melt, hoping it would be released. However the ice returned and trapped the ship even firmer, so many of the crew were airlifted out. The captain and a number of crewmen tried to wait out the winter on the ice by the ship, but one night in a ferocious winter storm the ship vanished, presumed sunk. She was first spotted a few days later some distance away by Inuit hunters who reported her. The HBC landed on the ice and collected what remained of her cargo before finally abandoning her. That was the beginning of her story.

She was repeatedly spotted and boarded, including by another group of Inuit hunters who sheltered aboard her for 10 days. Several attempts were made to salvage her, but always she managed to escape and continue to sail away. She came to be regarded as a cursed ship, with reports of severe storms occurring when people boarded her, and after a while locals started to avoid her when she was spotted.

The video is by a chap who's Youtube channel is named Mark Felton Productions. He specialises in interesting history tales including German U-boats in the Pacific, The true story of Nazi operations in the Antarctic and the only 'British' battleship to still survive today. His stuff is definitely worth a look if you like stories from History.
 
Mar 2016
741
Australia
#55
A little story I always loved was that of Augustus finding his young grandson reading a book by Cicero. Knowing what became of Cicero, the child tried to hide the book, but Augustus merely took it, read it, and remarked: "He was a learned man, child, a learned man who loved his country."
Very wholesome story. Cicero is possibly one of the only historical figures I can think of where literally everyone liked and admired him throughout history (well, except Antony). He just had this quality of being above partisanship and his words and wisdom reached everyone.
 
Likes: bedb
Sep 2014
801
Texas
#56
Like it or not, I am a fan of John Mosby. I read his biography and there was a small story in it that I will share. The Union soldiers kept a close watch on his wife and followed her everywhere she went. One day she went to visit a woman whose husband was a barber. She had a basket of stuff that seemed to be for the woman she was visiting. In the barber's chair was a man all lathered up and getting a shave. Mrs. Mosby chatted awhile just a friendly conversation about the kids and how they were doing, very domestic, all while her escorts loitered at the door. After awhile she gathered her things and left the basket. Her escorts followed her back down the street. The man in the chair finished paid his fee for the shave, retrieved the basket and slipped out back to his horse. The Grey Ghost had been right under their noses.
 
Mar 2016
741
Australia
#57
There's an off-hand story told in Andrew Roberts' biography of Napoleon that makes me smile every time I read it. While Napoleon was leading the French army in Italy in 1796-7 he got lost while scouting ahead through the mountains, and he found an Italian peasant who offered to help him get back on the right track. Along the way they talked with each other, and then said goodbye, Napoleon thanking the peasant for his help. Ten years later, when Napoleon was in Italy again (and for the last time) in 1805, following his coronation as King of Italy, he was riding through the hills and came across the same peasant's house. He greeted the peasant, and casually asked how he was doing, and also asked after his children, even remembering their names which he'd been told ten years ago. The peasant was apparently so amazed that Napoleon remembered not just him but his children's names that he started crying.
 

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
8,495
#58
A little story I always loved was that of Augustus finding his young grandson reading a book by Cicero. Knowing what became of Cicero, the child tried to hide the book, but Augustus merely took it, read it, and remarked: "He was a learned man, child, a learned man who loved his country."
Augustus agreed to have him killed., along with many others. I would be cautioius in accepting this story,
 

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
8,495
#59
There's an off-hand story told in Andrew Roberts' biography of Napoleon that makes me smile every time I read it. While Napoleon was leading the French army in Italy in 1796-7 he got lost while scouting ahead through the mountains, and he found an Italian peasant who offered to help him get back on the right track. Along the way they talked with each other, and then said goodbye, Napoleon thanking the peasant for his help. Ten years later, when Napoleon was in Italy again (and for the last time) in 1805, following his coronation as King of Italy, he was riding through the hills and came across the same peasant's house. He greeted the peasant, and casually asked how he was doing, and also asked after his children, even remembering their names which he'd been told ten years ago. The peasant was apparently so amazed that Napoleon remembered not just him but his children's names that he started crying.
Most likely fiction,. Who tells htis story? Any likley witness have a deep vested interest in the Napoleonic legend.
 

arkteia

Ad Honorem
Nov 2012
4,693
Seattle
#60
I do not remember the details, maybe someone could tell me them?

At the beginning of the Civil War, Washington, D.C. was totally unprotected. And despite appeals from Lincoln, the Union was not in a hurry. The first group to convene, and to respond, and to march, and to arrive, was the volunteers regiment from Rhode Island.

It moves me to no end. Basically open capital, probably, desperation is setting in, and suddenly, these guys from Rhode Island march in. Probably with music...

I don't remember where I read it, but Google does not give me the name of this regiment. I need to find it out.
 
Likes: Futurist

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