So many Italian Explorers and ?

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,631
Spain
#72
Whatever... But Charles I is because was the first king of Spain named Charles not because was firstly king of Spain. In any case he was an Habsburg.
I agree. He was an Habsburg (and a Trastamara). He inherited the Crown of Spain with their Seaborne and italian Dominions . The Holy Roman Empire and Burgundy.
 
Jun 2015
5,730
UK
#73
The italian states were pretty small, and not very powerful in the grand scheme.

And whilst the King of Spain in that period owned some of them as Holy Roman Emperor, his direct kingdom had bigger interests in the Americas.

Really, only the countries with both the inclination, means, and power to have colonies had them in the end. The Duke of Tuscany, or even the Pope, or the King of Sicily, were too small and weak to rival Spain, Portugal, and later England, the Netherlands and France for colonial spoils. Denmark and Sweden once traded in Africa and the Caribbean, but it didn't last since they were outcompeted by the British and French.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,679
Portugal
#74
The italian states were pretty small, and not very powerful in the grand scheme.

And whilst the King of Spain in that period owned some of them as Holy Roman Emperor, his direct kingdom had bigger interests in the Americas.

Really, only the countries with both the inclination, means, and power to have colonies had them in the end. The Duke of Tuscany, or even the Pope, or the King of Sicily, were too small and weak to rival Spain, Portugal, and later England, the Netherlands and France for colonial spoils. Denmark and Sweden once traded in Africa and the Caribbean, but it didn't last since they were outcompeted by the British and French.
Let us not forger that the kingdom of Sicily, as well as Sardinia, belonged to the Crown of Aragon, when the Age of Discoveries begun. King Fernando II was king of Sicily since 1468 even before he married with Isabel (1469). Later the Spanish conquered Naples in 1504. so the Spanish influence in Italy was not only because the King of Spain (Carlos I) owned some Italian states due to have become Holy Roman Emperor (1519).

But in the period of the Age of Discoverers we saw many Italian explorers, working for the Iberian kingdoms since their lack of human resources made them dependable of hired foreigners and the Italians were among the first.

With the problem that among those foreigners there were also spies, such as two well known characters: Amerigo Vespucci, Venetian, and the Dutch Linschoten, that provided intelligence for their home territories.
 
Likes: martin76
Jun 2015
5,730
UK
#75
It would be like some ICT geniuses from South America or Africa moving to the US, to work for Oracle, Apple, or Intel. The US is the home of the ICT industry, and that's where the action is. Brazil, Argentina, South Africa, or Nigeria, just don't compare in that regard.

Columbus and Vespucci both knew that the Italian states didn't have the resources to expand overseas, and Portugal and Spain did. Though Columbus sounded out the King of England (Henry VII) and the King of France, before the approached the Spanish.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,679
Portugal
#76
Columbus and Vespucci both knew that the Italian states didn't have the resources to expand overseas, and Portugal and Spain did. Though Columbus sounded out the King of England (Henry VII) and the King of France, before the approached the Spanish.
Vespucci was mostly a spy. That was not the case of Columbus.

If I recall correctly Columbus “sent” his brother Bartolomé to England and France, after his request had been denied by D. João II of Portugal and while he had his long waiting for the answer of the Catholic Monarchs, and not before he approached them. Bartolomé was in England in 1488 and in France in 1490.

But they are just two cases of the many Italian sailors that worked for Portugal since the 14th century.
 

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,631
Spain
#77
Vespucci was mostly a spy. That was not the case of Columbus.

If I recall correctly Columbus “sent” his brother Bartolomé to England and France, after his request had been denied by D. João II of Portugal and while he had his long waiting for the answer of the Catholic Monarchs, and not before he approached them. Bartolomé was in England in 1488 and in France in 1490.

But they are just two cases of the many Italian sailors that worked for Portugal since the 14th century.
I agree.. Vespuccio died in Sevilla and I don´t understand why the King didn´t order to behead him... It is a mystery to me.
 

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