some questions

Dec 2018
87
North Dublin
#1
i have read a few hundred books over the years, but recently realised that i am quite uneducated, regardless, as i read the wrong books & in the wrong order

i have a vague plan for the next year or so

please tell me if this makes sense

a general understanding of historical events is important to have, in regard to the trajectory of Meso-Egyptian, through Christian & secular civilisation, as well as insular accounts of specific aryan nations -

multi-volume history of mesopotamia (to be followed by chaldaea, israel, egypt, greece, persia, rome & italy)
multi-volume histories of germany, ireland & england (i am of german & irish parents)

aside from that, a general understanding of the history of literature, magic & philosophy would also make sense, in regard to the majority of lands mentioned, where the histories of magic & philosophy should just be two multi-volume works comprising "the western tradition" or even all traditions

-

please recommend any changes - i will embark on this journey starting tomorrow
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,048
Australia
#3
I agree with a narrow field to start off, perhaps with the parts of your list that attract you the most .

i have read a few hundred books over the years, but recently realised that i am quite uneducated, regardless, as i read the wrong books & in the wrong order

i have a vague plan for the next year or so

please tell me if this makes sense

a general understanding of historical events is important to have, in regard to the trajectory of Meso-Egyptian, through Christian & secular civilisation, as well as insular accounts of specific aryan nations -
A good starter for Egypt is Toby Wilkinesen's book ' Ancient Egypt - from the First farmers to The Great Pyramid

Which Aryan nations ? Do you mean Iran and India or the 16 Aryan older 'Nations' of the Vendidad ? if the later, this might be helpful;

Zoroastrianism Zoroastrian Zarathushtra Zarathustra Zoroaster Zoroastrians > (top index bar) early history > Avestan vendid Nations ( 1 - 16 )



multi-volume history of mesopotamia (to be followed by chaldaea, israel, egypt, greece, persia, rome & italy)
multi-volume histories of germany, ireland & england (i am of german & irish parents)

aside from that, a general understanding of the history of literature, magic & philosophy would also make sense, in regard to the majority of lands mentioned, where the histories of magic & philosophy should just be two multi-volume works comprising "the western tradition" or even all traditions

-

please recommend any changes - i will embark on this journey starting tomorrow
What do you mean by magic ? I have studied the western hermetic tradition for many years, it's probably better to focus on that other than 'magic' alone;

A good intro Patrick Harpur's ' The Philosophers Secret Fire : A History pf the Imagination ' ( In this dazzling history, Patrick Harpur links together fields as far apart as Greek philosophy and depth psychology, Renaissance magic and tribal ritual, Romantic poetry and the ecstasy of the shaman, to trace how societies have used myths to make sense of the world. )

For magic Cornelius Agrippa's ' Three Books of Occult Philosophy ' ( probably this version is better Three Books of Occult Philosophy by Cornelius Agrippa )

For the modern person to understand all this ^ - I highly reccomend you read this first , actually, I feel it is essential, or you could get lost in the sea of woo woo modern misunderstandings about the subject .... its also essential for an historical perspective .

The essential part is Chapter 1 , even just reading that 1 chapter will bring insight and understanding for future studies on philosophy and hermetics and ' how we used to think ' .

(I feel its so essential, I will even link to a free, easy to open and navigate pdf of same ;

The Origins Of Modern Science 1300-1800. by H.Butterfield

The Origins Of Modern Science 1300-1800 : H.Butterfield : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive
 
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Likes: Edratman
Jan 2010
4,365
Atlanta, Georgia USA
#4
i have read a few hundred books over the years, but recently realised that i am quite uneducated, regardless, as i read the wrong books & in the wrong order

i have a vague plan for the next year or so

please tell me if this makes sense

a general understanding of historical events is important to have, in regard to the trajectory of Meso-Egyptian, through Christian & secular civilisation, as well as insular accounts of specific aryan nations -

multi-volume history of mesopotamia (to be followed by chaldaea, israel, egypt, greece, persia, rome & italy)
multi-volume histories of germany, ireland & england (i am of german & irish parents)

aside from that, a general understanding of the history of literature, magic & philosophy would also make sense, in regard to the majority of lands mentioned, where the histories of magic & philosophy should just be two multi-volume works comprising "the western tradition" or even all traditions

-

please recommend any changes - i will embark on this journey starting tomorrow
I think it’s a good idea to start as far back as you have an interest. I’ve been doing something similar over the last 50 years or so. Problem is I’m only up to the 1920s—although I have a pretty good knowledge of WWII. I keep going back to fill in some area I missed or read out of order.

Good luck and good reading!
 
Jun 2017
133
maine
#5
It depends on why you are reading. IMO there is no wrong order because you will read what interests you. One book leads to another--and not always in the exact same field. Several times, I've thrown down a book saying "What twaddle!"--only to have a second thought occur: "Well, maybe...".
 
Feb 2013
4,280
Coastal Florida
#6
I agree with @Peter Graham. You might get a broad summary of all that over the next year but it won't provide a deep understanding of anything. If you'd rather just gloss over it, buy a World History textbook, like you'd find in a school. As for popular histories, there are some good ones out there but I would generally avoid them. If you're going that route, you might as well watch a documentary on tv as you'll probably only get the part of the story the narrator wants you to believe. If you want real understanding, nothing beats learning to connect the dots yourself by reading reams of scientific papers and excavation reports from the area you're really interested in...but, fair warning, nobody would call those light reading. Oftentimes, you'll find there's more to the story or additional perspectives which weren't even considered among the "facts" presented in a popular history or documentary you previously consumed.
 

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