Source hunting for Medieval Central Sudan (Ca. 500 - 1500 AD)

Jul 2013
85
Canada
#41
Wow, excellent article! It's really informative and will help me, and I'm sure many other people too. We need stuff like this, to spread the knowledge of Nubian and other African history.

I've always been interested in Alodia and the other medieval Nubian kingdoms. I have Welsby's "The Medieval Kingdoms of Nubia", and your article will fill in other missing gaps for me.
 
May 2015
1,298
Germany
#42
Happy that you like it. I've probably spent hundreds of hours into that thing and I am still not completely done yet (have to extend the architecture sub-chapter, copyright semi-problems on some images, minor fixes). I plan to make a similar overhaul for the Makuria entry, which should be way more in-depth. Especially looking forward to the sub-chapter discussing the concrete nature of the Makurian culture (Byzantine-Coptic-"black African"-Arabic). Already made a custom image for that part:

(dancing mask as depicted on a mural from Dongola)

By the way, if you or anyone else here is interested in the history of Darfur (also kinda central Sudan) you can check out my entry for the Daju kingdom, which just received the "Good Article"-status.
 
May 2016
974
Nabataea
#43
Eh, freaking annoying huh? It's extremely bothering for editors. Many articles could be appealing if not for that thing called copyright. Yeah, I kinda don't want my work to be stolen, but c'mon there are repeated photos of unknown copyright licences on the web. The author probably wouldn't care at this point. And oh, welcome back!
 
May 2015
1,298
Germany
#44
Eh, freaking annoying huh? It's extremely bothering for editors. Many articles could be appealing if not for that thing called copyright. Yeah, I kinda don't want my work to be stolen, but c'mon there are repeated photos of unknown copyright licences on the web.
That's not the problem. The thing is that the SARS (Sudan Archaeological Research Society) gifted me some photos (those with the logos in the lower corner), but to make it completely ok with the Wikipedia guidelines they would have to fill out a form for 100% confirmation that I didn't just upload them on my own. I don't want to bother them with that though, since they will probably not answer anyway. So I have to see how I want to work around that. Probably have to reproduce the pics with Gimp (like I did with the portrait of that Abdallab tribal member), or replace them entirely.
 
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May 2015
1,298
Germany
#45
Ground plan of "Temple 3 A", Musawwarat as-Sufra:


In Meroitic times, Musawwarat as-Sufra was an important temple complex in the steppes of the "Isle of Meroe" (Butana). After the fall of the kingdom of Kush in the 4th century most of the temples were abandoned, as they suddenly lacked state founding and the Noba, the new lords of the Sudanese Nile Valley, were apparently not interested in continuing the Meroitic religion, having a religion on their own. With the Alodian conversion in 580, building "Temple 3 A" was selected to serve the need of spreading the message of the Bible among the locals. Its conversion is attested mostly by Christian graffiti, which were carved into the bricks before they were burned, ceramics and a small Christian graveyard found nearby. The bricks, the graffiti and the ceramics are all surprisingly primitive, which imo outlines the peripherical character of "Temple 3 A". Sadly we don't know exactly how long this church in the steppe remained in use, but we do know that it collapsed because the wooden beams which held the roof were rotting. This might suggest that at some point, the local population did not bother to restore it for who knows what reason.
 
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Jul 2013
85
Canada
#48
I just read your article, it's really informative, thanks so much for writing it up! The states in this region are so interesting to me, and this truly fills in a lot of gaps in my knowledge. I've seen Fazughli mentioned in passing, but never read all these details, or seen so much on it together in one place.

The texts you cited are great too; a few I never heard of before, and I'm eager to check them out also!
 
Jul 2013
85
Canada
#49
By the way, regarding your article on Daju, are you also aware of the book "The Darfur Sultanate" by R. S. O'Fahey? While it is mainly about Darfur, it also has some info on Daju, as it was a precursor to early states in the region, before Darfur.

Just a heads up, in case you didn't know about that book and wanted to add more to your article, as I saw it wasn't listed in your references ( which is great by the way!).
 
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May 2015
1,298
Germany
#50
I just read your article, it's really informative, thanks so much for writing it up! The states in this region are so interesting to me, and this truly fills in a lot of gaps in my knowledge. I've seen Fazughli mentioned in passing, but never read all these details, or seen so much on it together in one place.

The texts you cited are great too; a few I never heard of before, and I'm eager to check them out also!
Thanks for the feedback, good to know that at least one person cares. Perhaps you will be interested to know that I am currently working on overhauling this sub-chapter, bringing it on the same niveau as the one dedicated to medieval Nubia. I am also playing with the thought of writing one entry for the Sanjak of Ibrim, i.e. the Ottoman province of Lower Nubia established in around 1560.

By the way, regarding your article on Daju, are you also aware of the book "The Darfur Sultanate" by R. S. O'Fahey? While it is mainly about Darfur, it also has some info on Daju, as it was a precursor to early states in the region, before Darfur.

Just a heads up, in case you didn't know about that book and wanted to add more to your article, as I saw it wasn't listed in your references ( which is great by the way!).
Already thought about buying that book, but according to several reviews it's for the most part just a rechauffe of O'Fahey's old book "State and Society in Darfur", which I already have access to.
 

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