South Slavs in the American Civil War

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
2,127
Republika Srpska
#1
Some of you may know me from many threads about the American Civil War and from my avatar I think it is quite clear that I am a Serb. So, why not combine the two? I have been unable to find much about the Serbs or other South Slavs in the ACW, but I found something. We know that a certain Anthony Cognevich (Antonije Konjević) from New Orleans organized his own company and became its captain. Since he was from Louisiana, this company fought for the South. This Cognevich Company was part of the Fourth Regiment of the European Brigade which was part of Louisiana Militia. Other South Slavs formed the Slavonian Rifles I and Slavonian Rifles II which also fought for the South. Slavonian Rifles I had 118 members as reported by the Daily Crescent. Apparently, many of the Southern South Slavs migrated West after the defeat of the Confederacy. As for the actual participation of South Slavs in the war, we have examples of Nikola Danilovich (Nikola Danilović) and George Petrovich (Đorđe Petrović). Danilovich was captured during the battle of Gettysburg and later defected to the Union, while Petrovich lost his life at Gettysburg. There was also Mario Grozovich (Mario Grozović) who served in 10th Lousiana Infantry and survived the war.

This is the known roster of the Cognevich Company:

Untitled2.png Untitled3.png

So, I guess I should honor my ancestory and their contribution to the cause of the Confederate States of America and their fight to preserve slavery states' rights.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
13,495
SoCal
#2
Very interesting!

I didn't expect there to be so many South Slavs who fought in the ACW simply because I wasn't aware of any significant South Slav immigration to the US before 1865.
 
Likes: Chlodio

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,246
Dispargum
#3
I would also not expect to find them in the Confederate Army. Most of the ports of entry for European immigrants were in the North: Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore. Very surprising to find them in New Orleans.
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,525
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#4
I would also not expect to find them in the Confederate Army. Most of the ports of entry for European immigrants were in the North: Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore. Very surprising to find them in New Orleans.
People who entered in Northern ports could travel to anyplace in the USA they wanted to, though the farther they traveled the more they would have to spend on transportation. And the North was more welcoming to immigrants than the South. So the majority of immigrants to the USA stayed in the North instead of the South. But there would still be many foreign immigrants who went to the South, even if they were a small minority of foreign immigrants..
 
Likes: Futurist

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
5,623
#5
New Orleans was a port and most of those Serbs or whatever probably came directly there from Europe. It was a longer trip. It was multiethnic from the beginning and majority Catholic. I guess the Serbs were Orthodox Christians though. It also had a booming economy and was a decent place to look for work.

The slave system in the south did not create good conditions for immigrant unskilled workers or those looking to own small farms.
 
Sep 2012
3,513
Bulgaria
#6
These mentioned in OP were Croats by ethnicity ergo Catholics. I am aware of XIXth anti-Catholicism movement in US, antebellum American Nativist party and their attitude towards European catholic migrants in general. A question: Was the South more religiously tolerant towards the Catholics than the North? Either that or the mere fact that their port of arrival was New Orleans was the reason for them being Confederates. The only Orthodox Christians migrants that participated in ACW on the side of the North and the South i am aware of were Greeks.
 
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Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
2,127
Republika Srpska
#7
These mentioned in OP were Croats by ethnicity ergo Catholics. I am aware of XIXth anti-Catholicism movement in US, antebellum American Nativist party and their attitude towards European catholic migrants in general. A question: Was the South more religiously tolerant towards the Catholics than the North? Either that or the mere fact that their port of arrival was New Orleans was the reason for them being Confederates. The only Orthodox Christians migrants that participated in ACW on the side of the North and the South i am aware of were Greeks.
I wouldn't say they were all Croats. There are some clear Serb names in the list, names like Lazar, Bogdan, Stefo, Špiro, Stanislav etc.
 
Sep 2012
3,513
Bulgaria
#8
@Maki By this logic i can claim that these are Bulgarians because these names are also common in my area. I found this list of Johnny Reb/ovichi Confederate Soldiers, which is almost identical to yours. During the ACW many Croatians served as individuals & in organized Croatian companies and fought for the South etc.

Croatian Soldiers in American CIvil War 1861-1865 genealogy project
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
2,127
Republika Srpska
#9
@Maki By this logic i can claim that these are Bulgarians because these names are also common in my area. I found this list of Johnny Reb/ovichi Confederate Soldiers, which is almost identical to yours. During the ACW many Croatians served as individuals & in organized Croatian companies and fought for the South etc.

Croatian Soldiers in American CIvil War 1861-1865 genealogy project
Except their last names end in -ić which is not something that is common among Bulgarians. Besides, names like Lazar and Stanislav are very clearly Serb names.
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,615
Western Eurasia
#10
i'm not sure if it was also necessary true in the 19th century, i mean Lazar and Stanislav are also catholic saint names, but in the list you posted the only Stanislav (Calugerovich) i see could only obviously be of Serb or other orthodox extraction. Calugerovich=Kaludjerovic= son of a kaludjer(= orthodox monk).
 

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