Space in Chinese vs Western cities

Feb 2011
6,112
#21
I think it's obvious that at least some of those models/pictorials were meant to show the city's grid layout, not to be treated literally for each and every building. Especially that first picture. The building's aren't there to reflect the actual amount of buildings in the city, but how the city was structured like a grid. I'm not aware of any ancient-medieval city in which we know the existence of each and every residence. If treated literally the city would have a population in the hundreds to thousands, hardly a million.
 
#22
I think it's obvious that at least some of those models/pictorials were meant to show the city's grid layout, not to be treated literally for each and every building. Especially that first picture. The building's aren't there to reflect the actual amount of buildings in the city, but how the city was structured like a grid. I'm not aware of any ancient-medieval city in which we know the existence of each and every residence. If treated literally the city would have a population in the hundreds to thousands, hardly a million.
Yeah youre definitely right about that. I'm guessing this is due to the limitations of the sources. A lot of written descriptions and diagrams just mention the "places of interest." Like the Sung map of Suzhou. It shows major temples, gates, government buildings, etc. but leaves large tracts of the city bare. I guess these models just represent the portions of these cities that are documented. They also ignore the suburbs beyond the walls.
 
#23
I am not sure but I suspect that some persons on here are treating this as an East vs West competition, with the idea that the city with the highest density is the "winner". From my point of view, Ancient Rome, on the basis of the level of food imports, plus the amount of water provided by its aqueducts, clearly had the highest population density of all cities, Eastern or Western, of the ancient world. However I do not regard this as any kind of "victory" for Rome or the West; I think it must have been extremely unhealthy, for the vast majority of the population, living there at that time, so densely packed were they.
 

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
7,039
#24
I think it's obvious that at least some of those models/pictorials were meant to show the city's grid layout, not to be treated literally for each and every building. Especially that first picture. The building's aren't there to reflect the actual amount of buildings in the city, but how the city was structured like a grid. I'm not aware of any ancient-medieval city in which we know the existence of each and every residence. If treated literally the city would have a population in the hundreds to thousands, hardly a million.
Rorhenbudlrf ob der Tauber still has its city walls, and is largely preserved . So cd buildings change all the time, what is the cutoff date to use? Unless a city is completely abandoned ,. There will always be changed to buildings in city.


Pompeii is another, Herculaneum also Ostia. We might know where every single building stood, but we probably know where most are, and theoretically, might find them a,. Foundations can be detected long after the building vanishes
 

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