Spanish leadership in Peru?

Jun 2019
5
Aix-en-Provence
#1
I have a question and hope you can help me?

We work on a movie project that plays in the just conquered Inca empire.

I´m supposed to play a young spanish military officer who first appears rather friendly and postive but after getting the control over the
Ollantaytambo area becomes more and more dark and basicly be on a power trip. Since there is little authority above.

What i need is design ideas for my style and costume. It must not be 100% accurate but should be close to the real thing.
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
5,566
#6
I dont know, that looks rather not so good. More like an old person. I´m just 23 years old. xD
Well, in Renaissance terms 23 is a mature man. Expect to be dead by 30 most likely. There wasn't the modern ideals of youth anyway, and no dress code for emphasizing youth or old age. Young people mostly would want to become as mature as possible as fast as possible (part of the neat trick of actually surviving to adulthood). Reach a certain age and not only would you have a wealth of experience all the dead young people never gained, but you were also a proven survivor. ;)

But yes, modern film and TV drama Renaissance costume dramas have mostly ditched the codpiece. It's apparently VERY difficult to make cool to modern audiences – invites a certain amount of hilarity rather.

However, the 16th c. would have been completely non-understanding of this modern thing against codpieces. They were there to tell everyone this really was a man's man. You would not want to be seen without one. ;)
 
Likes: martin76

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,485
Spain
#7
About clothes you can see this movie... you will watch how Pizarro is portraited (from minute 40)... pictured when the just appointed Captain Don Francisco Pizarro killed a Sucuri, a Ana-kka-honda or if you prefer Anaconda. (Pizarro full of Glory (or hungry) as San George killed a "dragoon") You can see the clothes and armoured used by the Conquistadores.


I hope you can to play the psychological profile of a 16th Century Spanish conquistador. You seek glory, honor, gold, to continue the struggle of centuries against the Moors . Pizarro is a 27 yo man when he arrived to Indies...unlike other conquerors, he does not belong to the nobility.. he is very poor man.. his childhood and adolescence was spent keeping pigs in Trujillo. He became a soldier and learned the art of war in the Spanish infantry ... under Il Grande Capitano´s command... fighting in Sicily . He landed in America in 1502.
As many others conquistadores.. he married an Indian woman: Inés Huaylas Yupanqui o Quispe Sisa.
 
Likes: Aristide
Mar 2015
858
Europe
#8
About clothes you can see this movie... you will watch how Pizarro is portraited (from minute 40)... pictured when the just appointed Captain Don Francisco Pizarro killed a Sucuri, a Ana-kka-honda or if you prefer Anaconda. (Pizarro full of Glory (or hungry) as San George killed a "dragoon") You can see the clothes and armoured used by the Conquistadores.


I hope you can to play the psychological profile of a 16th Century Spanish conquistador. You seek glory, honor, gold, to continue the struggle of centuries against the Moors . Pizarro is a 27 yo man when he arrived to Indies...unlike other conquerors, he does not belong to the nobility.. he is very poor man.. his childhood and adolescence was spent keeping pigs in Trujillo. He became a soldier and learned the art of war in the Spanish infantry ... under Il Grande Capitano´s command... fighting in Sicily . He landed in America in 1502.
As many others conquistadores.. he married an Indian woman: Inés Huaylas Yupanqui o Quispe Sisa.
Look at Men of Cajamarca (1972).
First, very few of the 168 men of Cajamarca were military - maximum 4, only 2 for certain. As in, having fought in Europe. Only one, Pedro de Candia, is a known professional soldier who had spent most of his adult life in Europe in military. Only one, Hernando Pizarro, had been an officer in Europe. As for Francisco Pizarro, he was 24 when he arrived in Indies,. and waited suspiciously long to make the claim to have fought in Italy. It was in an obscure time of his youth - may or may not be true.
If they had any military experience, it was in Indies. Over half had been in Indies for at least 5 years by 1532.

Francisco Pizarro was not technically noble because he was a bastard. His father, Gonzalo Pizarro Sr. had been a bachelor son of a Hernando Pizarro Sr. when he had Francisco; Francisco´s mother was from a poor family of the same town. In his childhood, Francisco grew up with his mother and maternal grandparents. His fater and paternal grandfather acknowledged the boy to the extent that the boy was sometimes received as a guest in his grandfather´s house; but he was not supported to the extent that he would have been taught to read or practice noble pursuits such as horse riding. When Francisco was in his teens, his mother moved away, married and had another son, Francisco de Alcantara; Francisco Pizarro first moved with his mother but soon moved on to his adventures.
Of Francisco´s 4 half-brethren, the said Francisco de Alcantara was not noble. Hernando Pizarro Jr. alone was noble - the one son born from wedlock, well educated, rode well and wrote fluently.
Juan and Gonzalo Pizarro... a bit different again. Bastards too, but by that time Gonzalo Sr. was his own master. Their mother moved away and married, too, when the affair was over - but in their case she left her sons to be raised by their widower father. It turned out to be not equal treatment with Hernando - but not equal treatment with Francisco either. Gonzalo could ride well, and wrote nice signatures, unlike Francisco - but turns out that unlike Hernando, he could not write anything besides signature.

In general, about a quarter of the men at Cajamarca were hidalgos - three quarters were not. Not a single don.

Of the 168, 76 were clearly or probanly literate, 41 clearly illiterate, 51 unknown. Francisco in the possibly smaller part of illiterates.

Ages? Of the 107 men of Cajamarca whose ages are known, 34 were under 25. And yes, there was "youth". Age 25 was relevant for holding office. 41 men were 25-29, and 19 were 30-34. Only 5 were above 40, and Francisco Pizarro at 54 was the only one above 50.

Oh and marriage? No, Francisco Pizarro did not marry, ever, and not Indian.
A few conquistadors did marry Indians, and those few were by and large accepted. Majority waited a few years for Spanish women to arrive in Peru. A substantial minority, Francisco Pizarro among them, took Indian mistresses but did not wed them.
 
Likes: Aristide

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,485
Spain
#9
Look at Men of Cajamarca (1972).
First, very few of the 168 men of Cajamarca were military - maximum 4, only 2 for certain. As in, having fought in Europe. Only one, Pedro de Candia, is a known professional soldier who had spent most of his adult life in Europe in military. Only one, Hernando Pizarro, had been an officer in Europe. As for Francisco Pizarro, he was 24 when he arrived in Indies,. and waited suspiciously long to make the claim to have fought in Italy. It was in an obscure time of his youth - may or may not be true.
If they had any military experience, it was in Indies. Over half had been in Indies for at least 5 years by 1532.

Francisco Pizarro was not technically noble because he was a bastard. His father, Gonzalo Pizarro Sr. had been a bachelor son of a Hernando Pizarro Sr. when he had Francisco; Francisco´s mother was from a poor family of the same town. In his childhood, Francisco grew up with his mother and maternal grandparents. His fater and paternal grandfather acknowledged the boy to the extent that the boy was sometimes received as a guest in his grandfather´s house; but he was not supported to the extent that he would have been taught to read or practice noble pursuits such as horse riding. When Francisco was in his teens, his mother moved away, married and had another son, Francisco de Alcantara; Francisco Pizarro first moved with his mother but soon moved on to his adventures.
Of Francisco´s 4 half-brethren, the said Francisco de Alcantara was not noble. Hernando Pizarro Jr. alone was noble - the one son born from wedlock, well educated, rode well and wrote fluently.
Juan and Gonzalo Pizarro... a bit different again. Bastards too, but by that time Gonzalo Sr. was his own master. Their mother moved away and married, too, when the affair was over - but in their case she left her sons to be raised by their widower father. It turned out to be not equal treatment with Hernando - but not equal treatment with Francisco either. Gonzalo could ride well, and wrote nice signatures, unlike Francisco - but turns out that unlike Hernando, he could not write anything besides signature.

In general, about a quarter of the men at Cajamarca were hidalgos - three quarters were not. Not a single don.

Of the 168, 76 were clearly or probanly literate, 41 clearly illiterate, 51 unknown. Francisco in the possibly smaller part of illiterates.

Ages? Of the 107 men of Cajamarca whose ages are known, 34 were under 25. And yes, there was "youth". Age 25 was relevant for holding office. 41 men were 25-29, and 19 were 30-34. Only 5 were above 40, and Francisco Pizarro at 54 was the only one above 50.

Oh and marriage? No, Francisco Pizarro did not marry, ever, and not Indian.
A few conquistadors did marry Indians, and those few were by and large accepted. Majority waited a few years for Spanish women to arrive in Peru. A substantial minority, Francisco Pizarro among them, took Indian mistresses but did not wed them.
As it would have been said by the endearing Leather Apron... we can go by pieces...


Francisco Pizarro was a keeper of pigs in his childhood... and he was a soldier in the Spanish Infantry. Not may yes or not.. .His father was a Hidalgo (Spanish Low nobility) Don Gonzalo Pizarro whose family settled in Trujillo (Extremadura, Kingdom of Castile in the Crown of Spain) in 13th Century. Don Gonzalo was a Professional Soldier, a Captain.. a veteran fought in Granada, Sicily, Naples and Navarra.
All the Pizarro´s family.. generation after generation had been soldiers (at least in in ARchives from early 14th Century): Don Rodrigo Alfonso Pizarro and his brother Martin Pizarro...both from Trujillo. They were Hidalgos as Cortes.

So we have that Pizarro´s family (at least from the last 10 generations) were soldiers.. (not bankers, sailors, trade men, farmers... but soldiers)... I back to Don Gonzalo Pizarro, his father (1446 - 1522) nicknamed El Largo (The large) and after lost one eye in battle.. El Tuerto (The one-eyed). He fought under Don Gonzalo Fernández de Cordoba´s command in Granade and in Italy. He took part in the Battle of Atella where Don Gonzalo de Córdoba defeated to Duke of Montpensier in 1496. Also Don Gonzalo Pizarro escorted to Gran Capitán in the Cephalonia Campaign (1500) that was crowned by the victory. Don Gonzalo de Pizarro in the Order of Battle is one of the captain of the Spanish Infantry as it is proved he took part in the battles of Cerignola, Garellano, Gaeta, Rocasseca.

Captain Pizarro back to Spain with Il grande Capitano in 1507 (Burgos). In 1512, when he is 66 yo.. he took part in the campaign in Navarre.. this time under Duke of Alva´s command. He died in 1522. He managed to ascend to the rank of colonel .

By Real Cédula, dated on December 22nd, 1537...not very much time as you say.. only 15 year after his father death...and when still lot of veterans are alive... the Conquistador of Il Piru... stated:

Francisco Pizarro, señor, caballero de la orden de Santiago, después de haber servido en las guerras de Italia y Navarra, con el coronel Gonzalo Pizarro, su padre, y Hernando Pizarro, su hermano, pasó a las islas de Barlovento…

Francisco Pizarro, Sir, Knight of the order of Santiago , after having served in the Wars in Italy and Navarra, under colonel Gonzalo Pizarro´s command, his father, and Hernando Pizarro, his brother, went to the Windward islands...


It is obvious that Francisco Pizarro was a soldier in the Spanish infantry and served with his father (and the Great Captain and the Duke of Alba) before going to the West Indies.



To say he didn´t know how to use a sword.. to say he lacked of military experience.. to say his family were a kind of "flower power".... you should prove. I believe in primary sources as everybody know here....save you have been member in the Spanish Army fought in Sicily and Naples under Don Gonzalos´s command and you give here your word of honor that you didn´t see Don Francisco Pizarro fighting shoulder to shoulder his father... I am not going to believe your "modernist" Theory...I don´t want theory.. I want FACTS.
 
Likes: Aristide