Spartacus....

Jan 2017
1
Merseyside, England
#1
So we all know the story of Spartacus and how the revolt he started eventually came to an end, but what of the man himself? Did he die that day it all came to an end, did he escape and start a new life? what do you guys think?
 
Jul 2016
8,661
USA
#3
Dead. He killed his horse before the last battle, preventing him from riding off. He knew he was going to lose that battle before he started it. He started a rebellion, had some success, but ultimately failed miserably (like most slave revolts do), being responsible for the deaths of all his followers. He wouldn't even have wanted to survive. Where is he going to run off to? He's too famous to ever be not hunted down, his people were already subjugated by the Romans, so he couldn't go home. Frankly, he couldn't even risk surviving the battle. If captured it would be crucifixion (the preferred execution for disloyal slave). Even taking a serious mortal wound and not dying immediately would have been problematic to say the least, a slow death, possibly with torture added if he was caught.

Between a quick and clean death in battle, something he would have understood intimately from past experience, vs. the threat of capture and torture and/or gruesome, humiliating mode of execution, the only answer is Death in battle, no brainer. Proven by what the sources report, he fought in the front ranks and got deep enough into the Roman line trying to reach Crassus (to join him in the afterlife) that he killed two centurions before himself being brought down.
 
Oct 2015
735
Virginia
#5
There was a chance (a slim one) for escape over the Alps after the defeat of C Cassius the governor of Cisalpine Gaul, but the army turned south and he went with them.

None of the sources (Suetonius, Plutarch, Appian, Florus) mention Caesars' role in the slave war. Broughton and Gelzer say he was elected military tribune in either 72 or 71BCE. If 72, its difficult to see how he could have avoided serving in the ill fated campaign of the consuls L Gellius Poplicola and Cn Cornelius Lentulus Clodianus. If 71, he likely served under Crassus.
 
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Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
2,499
Republika Srpska
#6
He died that day. He probably didn't want to be humiliated by the Romans so I wouldn't be surprised if he deliberately got himself killed. And I don't see how he could have even escaped. Crassus had besieged them at the tip of Italy and only a few managed to escape, Spartacus not among them.
 
Jan 2015
3,508
Australia
#7
There was a chance (a slim one) for escape over the Alps after the defeat of C Cassius the governor of Cisalpine Gaul, but the army turned south and he went with them.

None of the sources (Suetonius, Plutarch, Appian, Florus) mention Caesars' role in the slave war. Broughton and Gelzer say he was elected military tribune in either 72 or 71BCE. If 72, its difficult to see how he could have avoided serving in the ill fated campaign of the consuls L Gellius Poplicola and Cn Cornelius Lentulus Clodianus. If 71, he likely served under Crassus.
We just did a big thread on this, so I won't go into detail, but these guys were boned no matter what they did. There was no "escape". Once Rome got serious about them and sent real armies led by real generals that was it for them, they could no more escape over the alps than into Sicily.
 
Jul 2016
8,661
USA
#8
It seems like a clear exaggeration to try and hype up Spartacus. Based on how Roman troops deploy, there's no way he could have gotten anywhere near Crassus.
Once again, you know better than the sources do. Do tell, where did commanders always place themselves in a Roman formation?

Let me go track down how the battle was described in Colleen McCoullough's book because what she wrote and what you'll write will end up the same, as they normally are. Somehow...:suspicious:
 
Jul 2016
8,661
USA
#9
There was a chance (a slim one) for escape over the Alps after the defeat of C Cassius the governor of Cisalpine Gaul, but the army turned south and he went with them.

None of the sources (Suetonius, Plutarch, Appian, Florus) mention Caesars' role in the slave war. Broughton and Gelzer say he was elected military tribune in either 72 or 71BCE. If 72, its difficult to see how he could have avoided serving in the ill fated campaign of the consuls L Gellius Poplicola and Cn Cornelius Lentulus Clodianus. If 71, he likely served under Crassus.
At that time the passes in the Alps were not secure, they were home to numerous local tribes of Ligurians and other mountain peoples, who'd attack pretty everyone traveling through the area unless they got paid off. The tribes weren't subjugated until Augustus (who stood up the Tropaeum Alpium in commemoration).
 
Jan 2015
3,508
Australia
#10
Once again, you know better than the sources do. Do tell, where did commanders always place themselves in a Roman formation?

Let me go track down how the battle was described in Colleen McCoullough's book because what she wrote and what you'll write will end up the same, as they normally are. Somehow...:suspicious:
It's not just the usual formation that would negate it, it's also just hard to imagine how this information would have been reliably passed on. Remember, nobody had a clue what Spartacus looked liked out of the Romans, he would have been pretty much indistinguishable to other slave soldiers, so how did ordinary Roman foot know to account for his individual movements in a sea of slave soldiers? We don't even really need to negate the sources either, since they don't say he reached Crassus, merely that he tried to. I can't imagine he got particularly close though, given there's no record of Crassus being in the front lines (and it would have been bizarre for him to be so in the circumstances). I don't even think they found his body, so the idea that they were able to follow his movements during the battle seems a stretch (which is hard in the best of cases, given the sea of swords and shields clashing together chaotically; the whole thing is pandemonium on a micro level).
 
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