Speculative Succession Law?

Aug 2018
12
Bangladesh
#1
Not strictly a "History" question. So forgive me for that but I thought this is the best place I can hope for some informed answers.

Background: Once upon a time my family were powerful landowners in and around my present day hometown. Our titles were equivalent to Earl/Count. We no longer hold any real power but we do command a lot of respect from local residence. The "Title" is still carried by my family but without any legal or real power associated with it.

Present Situation: Currently my eldest Male Cousin(Only son of my Late Eldest Uncle) holds the title. My late Father was the Third Son out of Five. I am have an Older Brother who in turn has a Son of his own. My Cousin who is the Current Title Holder has Two Sons of his own. It is generally assumed that his Eldest Son will carry the Title after him. Nobody really could explain a succession law or something similar/

Speculation: Assuming that My Cousin along with his two sons die or simply vanish from the calculation, Who is likely to succeed? What are my chances? My Late Second Uncle has no son but two daughters and as far as I can tell women do not succeed to the Title in the family. However My Eldest Cousin has Four Sisters and 2nd Eldest of them do have a Son. Any chance he might put a claim? Or he isn't even in the calculation as he is decentdent from a Female Line?

Thanks if any of you take your time a look into it.
 
Likes: Futurist
Jul 2016
8,472
USA
#4
Sounds like you're at the bottom of the list, so you'll have to kill a whole lot more family members before you get the promotion, which as you describe seems kind of pointless because it doesn't come with any legit perks.
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,869
Las Vegas, NV USA
#5
The British succession law: before 1999 it followed male primogenitor. Sons of the noble succeed by birth order. If there are no legitimate sons, daughters succeed by birth order. This was not possible under Salic law which prevailed in France, Germany and some other European countries where females were not eligible. If there are no eligible legitimate children, it goes to the eldest male sibling of the noble and the process repeats. If there are no siblings, to first cousins, etc.
 
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stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,869
Las Vegas, NV USA
#6
\My Late Second Uncle has no son but two daughters and as far as I can tell women do not succeed to the Title in the family. However My Eldest Cousin has Four Sisters and 2nd Eldest of them do have a Son. Any chance he might put a claim? Or he isn't even in the calculation as he is decentdent from a Female Line?

Thanks if any of you take your time a look into it.
Under Salic Law the succession cannot pass through the female line. It sounds like this applies to your situation. However there is a difference between female succession and the succession passing through the female line. I'm not aware of any modern example of this where females cannot succeed.

The present British line can be traced to George I who inherited the throne based on the female line but Britain did not have Salic Law.
 
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MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,672
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#7
Under Salic Law the succession cannot pass through the female line. It sounds like this applies to your situation. However there is a difference between female succession and the succession passing through the female line. I'm not aware of any modern example of this where females cannot succeed.

The present British line can be traced to George I who inherited the throne based on the female line but Britain did not have Salic Law.
Modern European examples of succession not passing through the female lines are called agnatic primogeniture as in France or Germany for example.

See here: Primogeniture - Wikipedia

And here: Order of succession - Wikipedia

And here: List of monarchies by order of succession - Wikipedia

In many but not all Asian cultures succession through females is unheard of.
 
May 2013
1,720
The abode of the lord of the north
#8
Well I think I've heard about a possible succession law which might be true in your case. Certain 'Family head' positions in India used to follow this succession law;
1) Once your oldest cousin renounces his title, it will go to his eldest son. In case if his eldest son is not there, then it goes to his younger son. However if both sons aren't there and your oldest cousin renounces his title, then it goes to next eldest male in the family; your older brother.
2) Now once he attains the title, then even if he renounce it immediately afterwards, it will go to his son only. You'll have to wait longer.
3) Your chance comes if your oldest cousin renounces and his both sons and your older brother isn't there. If your brother doesn't take up the title, then his son has no right to it, because you are elder than him.

Is that any clear?
 
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
#9
In my office, I once worked with a man who was 27th in line to the British throne.( long before Diana Spencer)

Are Indian titles inherited by Primogeniture? If so, to use the Aussie vernacular, you're stuffed mate.
 
Aug 2018
12
Bangladesh
#10
Thanks for all the informative answers everyone.

I think what Ajathashatru said, may be applicable in my family, as after all I come from Bangladesh. I really don't know if the established succession law was Primogeniture or Salic etc as many of you explained here, but what I can say with certainty is that our family title never followed through the female line in nearly 700 years. My ancestor was granted lands by the Sultan of Bengal Shamsuddin Firoz Shah. Three centuries latter Bengal Sulnate became part of the Mughal Empire and we were granted more lands by Emperor Jahangir. My ancestors took part in various succession wars for the mughal throne supporting various princes..
 

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