Story of Vishvamitra in Rigveda and Purana?

Jul 2018
63
North America
#1
It seems to me that's story of Indian sage vishwamitra is very different in rigveda and puranas.

In rigveda he is the royal priest of King sudas, no mention of kshatriya roots and Mighty warrior with life located in Haryana, Jammu and Kashmir regions.

In puranas he was the kshatriya, very negative, killer and wanted to steal Nandini cow and after fight with sage Vashistha became a brahmarishi.

Which one is true ? I believe as rigveda is true one we must agree that it's the true and puranic story is just a myth

Also story of cow Nandini and vishwamitra-vashistha war is 99% similar to another war between sages, I forgot their names.
 
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Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,482
New Delhi, India
#3
"The Vedanga Jyotisha introduces the third change, when the seasons had further fallen back, not by a month, but by a fortnight. It was probably during this interval that the beginning of the month was altered from the full-moon to the new-moon, and when this beginning of the month was so altered, advantage was taken of the receding of the seasons by a fortnight, to commence the year with the new-moon in Dhanishtha as the Vedanga Jyotisha has done. From this the next recorded step is to Ashvini. There is, however, an interesting story related in the Mahabharata which evidently refers to an abortive attempt to reform the calendar when the seasons had again fallen back by a fortnight. In the 71st chapter of Adiparva we are told that Visvamitra attempted to create a new world, and make the nakshatras (asterisms) commence with Shravana, instead of Dhanishtha; and the same story is alluded to in the Ashvamedha Parva, chapter 44. The tradition can also be found in other Puranas where Visvamitra is represented as endeavouring to create a new celestial sphere. It appears, however, that he did not succeed, and the Krittika-system, as modified by the Vedanga Jyotisha, continued to regulate the calendar until the list of the nakshatras was quietly made to begin, as noticed in the third chapter, with Ashvini in later times."
"Orion or the Researches on the Antiquity of Vedas", BG Tilak, page 215-6.

Explanation: Hindu calendars are divided into two systems. In some the month starts with the new moon, in others, it starts with the full moon (Purnimanta and Amavsyanta). What is described here happened around 1,000 BC. Before that, the Aryan year began on the vernal equinox when the sun rose in the asterism of Krittikas (Pleiades). Due to the precession of equinox, by 1,000 BC, the seasons had slipped by a fortnight. Vishwamitra, the sage, also was an astronomer (nothing surprising in this, the knowledge of astronomy was a part and parcel of the education of a brahmins because he was supposed to conduct the rituals according to astronomical positions). Vishvamitra suggested the calendar to be corrected by a fortnight. But this was not accepted by the orthodox. And they came out with derogatory stories about him which we find in Puranas. Vishwamitra did not succeed, but a thousand years later, the brahmins had to change the calendar by whole one month and make the New Year begin with the asterism of Ashwini (Arietis). My section of Kashmiri brahmins is known as 'Malmasis', i.e., we calculate the month from Amavasya (New Moon); and in a way, follow Vishwamitra.

If that is true, Vishwamitra can be dated to around 1,000 BC.
 
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Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,054
USA
#4
"The Vedanga Jyotisha introduces the third change, when the seasons had further fallen back, not by a month, but by a fortnight. It was probably during this interval that the beginning of the month was altered from the full-moon to the new-moon, and when this beginning of the month was so altered, advantage was taken of the receding of the seasons by a fortnight, to commence the year with the new-moon in Dhanishtha as the Vedanga Jyotisha has done. From this the next recorded step is to Ashvini. There is, however, an interesting story related in the Mahabharata which evidently refers to an abortive attempt to reform the calendar when the seasons had again fallen back by a fortnight. In the 71st chapter of Adiparva we are told that Visvamitra attempted to create a new world, and make the nakshatras (asterisms) commence with Shravana, instead of Dhanishtha; and the same story is alluded to in the Ashvamedha Parva, chapter 44. The tradition can also be found in other Puranas where Visvamitra is represented as endeavouring to create a new celestial sphere. It appears, however, that he did not succeed, and the Krittika-system, as modified by the Vedanga Jyotisha, continued to regulate the calendar until the list of the nakshatras was quietly made to begin, as noticed in the third chapter, with Ashvini in later times."
"Orion or the Researches on the Antiquity of Vedas", BG Tilak, page 215-6.

Explanation: Hindu calendars are divided into two systems. In some the month starts with the new moon, in others, it starts with the full moon (Purnimanta and Amavsyanta). What is described here happened around 1,000 BC. Before that, the Aryan year began on the vernal equinox when the sun rose in the asterism of Krittikas (Pleiades). Due to the precession of equinox, by 1,000 BC, the seasons had slipped by a fortnight. Vishwamitra, the sage, also was an astronomer (nothing surprising in this, the knowledge of astronomy was a part and parcel of the education of a brahmins because he was supposed to conduct the rituals according to astronomical positions). Vishvamitra suggested the calendar to be corrected by a fortnight. But this was not accepted by the orthodox. And they came out with derogatory stories about him which we find in Puranas. Vishwamitra did not succeed, but a thousand years later, the brahmins had to change the calendar by whole one month and make the New Year begin with the asterism of Ashwini (Arietis). My section of Kashmiri brahmins is known as 'Malmasis', i.e., we calculate the month from Amavasya (New Moon); and in a way, follow Vishwamitra.

If that is true, Vishwamitra can be dated to around 1,000 BC.
Yes Vishwamitra was a revolutionary astronomer who fought with the then reigning astronomer Vasishta. Both wrote tons of hymns about astronomy. The story of Trishanku is his revolutionary idea of making the nakshatras start with Shravana. From all these, we can conclude Vishwamitra lived around 1000 BCE, and Vasishta around 1030 BCE.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,482
New Delhi, India
#5
Yes Vishwamitra was a revolutionary astronomer who fought with the then reigning astronomer Vasishta. Both wrote tons of hymns about astronomy. The story of Trishanku is his revolutionary idea of making the nakshatras start with Shravana. From all these, we can conclude Vishwamitra lived around 1000 BCE, and Vasishta around 1030 BCE.
You need some evidence to date people. Sage Upamanyu surely was pre-700 BC because Yaska mentions Aupamanyava as being prior to him, and Yaska is dated at 700 BC. In case of Sage Vishwamitra or one of his descendants (who would also be known as Kaushika), I have given what evidence is available. Otherwise all descendants of Sage Vasishtha are Vasishthas, all descendents of Sage Atri are Aatreyas and all descendants of Sage Upamnyu are Aupamanyavas. There is no evidence to date Sages Atri and Vasishtha.
 

Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,054
USA
#7
You need some evidence to date people. Sage Upamanyu surely was pre-700 BC because Yaska mentions Aupamanyava as being prior to him, and Yaska is dated at 700 BC. In case of Sage Vishwamitra or one of his descendants (who would also be known as Kaushika), I have given what evidence is available. Otherwise all descendants of Sage Vasishtha are Vasishthas, all descendents of Sage Atri are Aatreyas and all descendants of Sage Upamnyu are Aupamanyavas. There is no evidence to date Sages Atri and Vasishtha.
You should ask yourself, who dated Yaska, and why to 700 BCE? As I said, I have not seen one convincing argument from your side so far, not one.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,482
New Delhi, India
#8
Jitendra N. Mohanty, Editors of Encyclopedia Britannica at Indian philosophy
Harold G. Coward (1990). The Philosophy of the Grammarians, in Encyclopedia of Indian Philosophies Volume 5 (Editor: Karl Potter). Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-81-208-0426-5.

"The field of Nirukta deals with ascertaining the meaning of words, particularly of archaic words no longer in use, ones created long ago and even then rarely used. The Vedic literature from the 2nd millennium BCE has a very large collection of such words, with nearly 25% of the words therein being used just once. By the 1st millennium BCE, interpreting and understanding what the Vedas meant had become a challenge, and Nirukta attempted to systematically propose theories on how words form, and then determine their meaning in order to understand the Vedas.

Yaska, the sage who likely lived around the 7th-century BCE, approached this problem through a semantic analysis of words, by breaking them down into their components, and then combined them in the context they were used to propose what the archaic words could have meant."
Nirukta - Wikipedia
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,482
New Delhi, India
#10
Check this: Not Wikipedia, it is a Prince University researcher Harold G. Coward along with K. Kunjunni Raja edited by Karl Potter and referenced in Encyclopedia Britannica by Jitendra N. Mohanty. That is how historical research works. Do you have something more authentic about as to when Yaska lived? (Book description in Google Books)

Yaska.jpg
 
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