Story of Vishvamitra in Rigveda and Purana?

Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,062
USA
#11
Check this: Not Wikipedia, it is a Prince University researcher Harold G. Coward along with K. Kunjunni Raja edited by Karl Potter and referenced in Encyclopedia Britannica by Jitendra N. Mohanty. That is how historical research works. Do you have something more authentic about as to when Yaska lived? (Book description in Google Books)

View attachment 12783
I asked you to quote the relevant section that dates YAska.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,484
New Delhi, India
#12
I have already mentioned that in detail. You did not care to go through that.
This link will take you to the book at Google Books. Go to the contents and click Part 2, Chapter 2. That is where K. Raja discusses Yaska's period.
That was reported by Jitendra N. Mohanty in Encyclopedia Britannica, one of the editors of Encyclopedia Britannica at Indian philosophy
I also give below information on Kunjunni Raja and Jitendra Mohanty:
Dr. K Kunjunni Raja, Jitendra Nath Mohanty - Wikipedia
 
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Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,062
USA
#13
I have already mentioned that in detail. You did not care to go through that.
This link will take you to the book at Google Books. Go to the contents and click Part 2, Chapter 2. That is where K. Raja discusses Yaska's period.
That was reported by Jitendra N. Mohanty in Encyclopedia Britannica, one of the editors of Encyclopedia Britannica at Indian philosophy
I also give below information on Kunjunni Raja and Jitendra Mohanty:
Dr. K Kunjunni Raja, Jitendra Nath Mohanty - Wikipedia
Ha ha ha,

This is what I found in that book:

"Yaska and Panini are the two great early writers on language. They belong to a period several centuries before Christ, possibly the fifth century. Yaska is generally considered to be earlier than Panini, but Paul Thieme holds that Yaska knew Panini. George Cardona thinks it wise to leave the problem open."


What an insightful analysis! I am waiting for my new pair of glasses to see if I missed any brilliant argument for that fifth century date. You can go gaga over such stuff, not me.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,484
New Delhi, India
#16
The general view is that Yaska was prior to Panini because Panini quotes him. That leaves the question open as to when Panini lived. The suggested dates vary from 800 BC to 400 BC. We just did not care about these little things. The message was important. :D
 

Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,062
USA
#17
The general view is that Yaska was prior to Panini because Panini quotes him. That leaves the question open as to when Panini lived. The suggested dates vary from 800 BC to 400 BC. We just did not care about these little things. The message was important. :D
Why are you then holding conversation about dates? I quote Panini, but that does not mean I lived only couple centuries after Panini. Your arguments (together with the ones you quote) have no logic.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,484
New Delhi, India
#18
When we do not know exactly about something, we talk about various possibilities. Writing up of various 'mandalas' of RigVeda, arrival of Aryans in India, dating of Brahmanas, Aranykas, Upanishads, Yaska and Panini are such things. Sometimes indications are available as in the four points in RigVeda which possibly could mean an origin in sub-Arctic regions (mention of seven suns, a long night, a month-long dawn, and priests who completed their sacrificial calendar in nine or ten months - Navagwahas and Dashagwahas) or the mention of positions of asterisms, planets and stars in scriptures.

"But the subsequent discovery, by my friend the late Mr. S. B. Dixit, of a passage in the Shatapatha Brâhmana, plainly stating that the Kṛittikâs never swerved, in those days, from the due east i.e., the Vernal equinox, has served to dispel all lingering doubts regarding the age of the Brâhmanas; while another Indian astronomer, Mr. V. B. Ketkar, in a recent number of the Journal of the Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, has mathematically worked out the statement in the Taittirîya Brâhmana (III, 1, 1, 5), that Bṛihaspati, or the planet Jupiter, was first discovered when confronting or nearly occulting the star Tishya, and shown that the observation was possible only at about 4650 B.C., thereby remarkably confirming my estimate of the oldest period of Vedic literature. After this, the high antiquity of the oldest Vedic period may, I think, be now taken as fairly established."

"Rig-Vedic traditions were formed, and that the Vedic literature contained enough clear evidence of the successive changes of the position of the vernal equinox up to the present time. Thus the vernal equinox was in Kṛittikâs in the time of the Taittirîya Samhitâ and Brâhmana (2,500 BC) and the express text stating that “The Kṛittikâs never swerve from the due east; all other Nakshatras do” (Shat. Brâ. II. 1, 2, 3), recently published by the late Mr. S. B. Dixit, serves to remove whatever doubts there might be regarding the interpretation of other passages. This record of the early position of the Kṛittikâs, or the Pleiades, is as important for the determination of the Vedic chronology as the orientation of pyramids and temples has been shown to be in the case of the Egyptian, by Sir Norman Lockyer in his Dawn of Ancient Astronomy."
"Arctic Home in Vedas", BG Tilak, (where else! ;)) Preface (page 2) and page 41
 
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Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,062
USA
#19
When we do not know exactly about something, we talk about various possibilities. Writing up of various 'mandalas' of RigVeda, arrival of Aryans in India, dating of Brahmanas, Aranykas, Upanishads, Yaska and Panini are such things. Sometimes indications are available as in the four points in RigVeda which possibly could mean an origin in sub-Arctic regions (mention of seven suns, a long night, a month-long dawn, and priests who completed their sacrificial calendar in nine or ten months - Navagwahas and Dashagwahas) or the mention of positions of asterisms, planets and stars in scriptures.

"But the subsequent discovery, by my friend the late Mr. S. B. Dixit, of a passage in the Shatapatha Brâhmana, plainly stating that the Kṛittikâs never swerved, in those days, from the due east i.e., the Vernal equinox, has served to dispel all lingering doubts regarding the age of the Brâhmanas; while another Indian astronomer, Mr. V. B. Ketkar, in a recent number of the Journal of the Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, has mathematically worked out the statement in the Taittirîya Brâhmana (III, 1, 1, 5), that Bṛihaspati, or the planet Jupiter, was first discovered when confronting or nearly occulting the star Tishya, and shown that the observation was possible only at about 4650 B.C., thereby remarkably confirming my estimate of the oldest period of Vedic literature. After this, the high antiquity of the oldest Vedic period may, I think, be now taken as fairly established."

"Rig-Vedic traditions were formed, and that the Vedic literature contained enough clear evidence of the successive changes of the position of the vernal equinox up to the present time. Thus the vernal equinox was in Kṛittikâs in the time of the Taittirîya Samhitâ and Brâhmana (2,500 BC) and the express text stating that “The Kṛittikâs never swerve from the due east; all other Nakshatras do” (Shat. Brâ. II. 1, 2, 3), recently published by the late Mr. S. B. Dixit, serves to remove whatever doubts there might be regarding the interpretation of other passages. This record of the early position of the Kṛittikâs, or the Pleiades, is as important for the determination of the Vedic chronology as the orientation of pyramids and temples has been shown to be in the case of the Egyptian, by Sir Norman Lockyer in his Dawn of Ancient Astronomy."
"Arctic Home in Vedas", BG Tilak, (where else! ;)) Preface (page 2) and page 41
Talk something that is sensible and related to the matter. And no, there is no long dawn, no long dusk, no long night, no Arctic nonsense. Let alone YAska, even Angiras, Bhrgu and Atri did not see any Arctic.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,484
New Delhi, India
#20
Talk something that is sensible and related to the matter. And no, there is no long dawn, no long dusk, no long night, no Arctic nonsense. Let alone YAska, even Angiras, Bhrgu and Atri did not see any Arctic.
Atharvans and Angirasas were there at that time. They helped Indra in his fight with the dasas.

"But Manu was not alone to offer this ancient sacrifice to the gods. In X, 63, 7, he is said to have made the first offerings to the gods along with the seven Hotṛis; while Angiras and Yayâti are mentioned with him as ancient sacrificers in I, 31, 17, Bhṛigu and Angiras in VIII, 43, 13, Atharvan and Dadhyañch in I, 80, 16 and Dadhyañch, Angiras, Atri and Kanva in I, 139, 9. Atharvan by his sacrifices is elsewhere described, as having first extended the paths, whereupon the sun was born (I, 83, 5), and the Atharvans, in the plural, are styled “our fathers” (nah pitarah) along with Angirases, Navagvas and Bhṛgus in X, 14, 6. In II, 34, 12, Dashagvas are said to have been the first to offer a sacrifice; while in X, 92, 10 Atharvan is spoken of, as having established order by sacrifices, when the Bhṛigus showed themselves as gods by their skill."
"Arctic Home in Vedas", BG Tilak, page 147, Chapter VII, 'Months and Seasons'.

Aatreya, Lokmanya was not an ordinary researcher. He was very thorough and never wrote anything without reference from scriptures. Your bias against him is unjustified.
 

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