Stupidest territorial acquisitions

Sep 2016
804
Georgia
#21
Do you think that Austria would have been much friendlier with France without French expansion into Alsace and Lorraine?
I think conflict was inevitable. France was surrounded by Habsburg possessions. It was ,, Habsburg encirclement ''.



You can draw parallels to modern situation with Russia. Russians feel surrounded by NATO.

France had to give up their desires to break this encirclement, if they wanted to avoid any conflict.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,569
SoCal
#23
I think conflict was inevitable. France was surrounded by Habsburg possessions. It was ,, Habsburg encirclement ''.



You can draw parallels to modern situation with Russia. Russians feel surrounded by NATO.

France had to give up their desires to break this encirclement, if they wanted to avoid any conflict.
A better strategy in hindsight would have been to wait until the Bourbons would have acquired the Spanish throne, no?
 
Sep 2016
804
Georgia
#24
A better strategy in hindsight would have been to wait until the Bourbons would have acquired the Spanish throne, no?
Well, Louis XIV marriage to Maria Theresa of Spain was the result of Franco - Spanish war in 1635 - 1659. The negotiations for the marriage contract were intense. Eager to prevent a union of the two countries or crowns, especially one in which Spain would be subservient to France, the diplomats sought to include a renunciation clause that would deprive Maria Theresa and her children of any rights to the Spanish succession. This was eventually done but, by the skill of Mazarin and his French diplomats, the renunciation and its validity were made conditional upon the payment of a large dowry. As it turned out, Spain, impoverished and bankrupt after decades of war, was unable to pay such a dowry, and France never received the agreed upon sum of 500,000 ecus. Spain's inability to pay dowry will also be used by Louis as cause for War of Devolution in 1667 - 1668.

When Philip IV died in 1665, the French king immediately laid claim to parts of the Spanish Netherlands, the Duchies of Brabant and Limburg, Cambrai, the Marquisate of Antwerp, the Lordship of Mechelen, Upper Guelders, the counties of Namur, Artois and Hainaut, a third of the County of Burgundy and a quarter of the Duchy of Luxembourg. Louis XIV justified this with the fact that the promised dowry had not been paid, and that the French queen's renunciation of her Spanish inheritance was therefore invalid. Louis argued that his wife's prior claims to her father's estate properly "devolved" to her.

French legal scholars concluded from this and the clause of 'devolution' that the Spanish Netherlands should not go to the underage heir to the Spanish throne, Charles II, since he had been born as a result of the second marriage of Philip IV. Maria Theresa on the other hand was a result of his first marriage and was therefore entitled to the inheritance in Brabant and through her, Louis XIV; they argued that the Queen could not renounce this natural right for her children.

France still had to fight for Spanish throne against Coalition, in the end.
 
Sep 2016
804
Georgia
#25
I will also say that there were few proposed scenarios to divide Spanish inheritance. If situation would develop according to one of them, big war possibly could be avoided. Louis actually kinda tried to avoid another great war with Europe. However, it all turned out in different way and France fought for all Spanish inheritance.
 

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