Sweden wins the Great Northern War

Jul 2009
9,944
#21
The man was a mad genius.

I mean seriously there was a touch of madness (well, more than a touch) to this guy and when you read about his childhood it's none-too suprising. And Driven. Relentless as hell once he set his mind on something. That's a good way to come out on top in the end.
Well then he and Charles XII had something in common. :)
 
Jul 2009
9,944
#23
How come the US never had a peasantry?
Outside my comfort zone. The US did not become a great power until the 20th century, so with that qualification, a peasantry had never developed here. People were expected to look after themselves and family dynamics were more important than now.

In an overwhelmingly agricultural society, a sharecropper and a small freeholder were probably indistinguishable. However, the freeholder OWNED something of value. Slaves before the late 19th century were slaves, not peasants. They had a different economic origin, and a different social "position."

Social gradation in the US was different (perhaps much like Brazil).
 
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Theodoric

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
2,876
#25
How come the US never had a peasantry?
The US had a very different culture; far more polarized due to slavery. Huge economic swings and instability until WW2 (The Great Depression was simply the last of about a dozen major economic collapses through US history). The peasant class still exists, but it is simply what we would call wage workers today who lack the ability to generate a source of income independent of employment. Especially those with few assets (renters). Peasants often had it a lot better off (in terms of land ownership and access to available services), relatively speaking, than many modern people who consider themselves "middle class."
 
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Feb 2019
345
California
#26
The US had a very different culture; far more polarized due to slavery. Huge economic swings and instability until WW2 (The Great Depression was simply the last of about a dozen major economic collapses through US history). The peasant class still exists, but it is simply what we would call wage workers today who lack the ability to generate a source of income independent of employment. Especially those with few assets (renters). Peasants often had it a lot better off (in terms of land ownership and access to available services), relatively speaking, than many modern people who consider themselves "middle class."
You just suggested that everybody who works for a living is a peasant. Hmmm...you are a braver man than I!
 
Likes: Futurist
Jul 2009
9,944
#27
The US had a very different culture; far more polarized due to slavery. Huge economic swings and instability until WW2 (The Great Depression was simply the last of about a dozen major economic collapses through US history). The peasant class still exists, but it is simply what we would call wage workers today who lack the ability to generate a source of income independent of employment. Especially those with few assets (renters). Peasants often had it a lot better off (in terms of land ownership and access to available services), relatively speaking, than many modern people who consider themselves "middle class."
The wage worker still has the right to create a source of income independent from another source. He is not a peasant if he can establish a business and either profit from the effort, or sell it for gain. if the worker stays in his rut, that is his choice, and perhaps his fault. Peasants have usually been identified with agricultural labor and had few if any alternatives.

The current "class" of unfortunates is the debt slave created by either credit over extension, or by the infamy of student debt. However, even there, the individual has a choice of over reaching his credit, or the choice of attending post secondary schooling at someone else's (one or more creditors') expense. There are other job/career paths than accumulating $100,000, or $250,000, in debt for the same degree everyone else has. He might be better off joining one of the military services for the educational benefits later.
 
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