Swords of the Age

CelticBard

Historum Emeritas
Aug 2006
758
Roving
#1
Rapiers became the dominant sword type of the Renaissance, does anyone want to share why they believe this to be so, or why they do not think it was?
 

Commander

Historum Emeritas
Jun 2006
1,362
Jacksonville, FL
#2
I think the sword spread in popularity because of it weighed much less than previous medieval swords, and still had the stength to deal a fatal blow.
 
Jun 2006
268
#3
The 3 Musketeers made it popular. The rapier was light weight, strong, easy to move with, easy to conceal.

Maybe it was also a simble of honor and nobility?
 

Belisarius

Forum Staff
Jun 2006
10,359
U.K.
#4
CelticBard said:
Rapiers became the dominant sword type of the Renaissance, does anyone want to share why they believe this to be so, or why they do not think it was?
Rapiers were mainly used by civilian "gentlemen". In war, soldiers reverted to more sturdy, heavier, types of swords.
 

CelticBard

Historum Emeritas
Aug 2006
758
Roving
#5
Well in war the gentlemen, or nobility, were using sabers, broadswords, and pistols if they were cavalrymen or spontoons and partisans if they were infantry officers. Cortes's men in Mexico, the Conquistadors, would have used rapiers of Toledo steel.
 

Belisarius

Forum Staff
Jun 2006
10,359
U.K.
#6
CelticBard said:
Well in war the gentlemen, or nobility, were using sabers, broadswords, and pistols if they were cavalrymen or spontoons and partisans if they were infantry officers. Cortes's men in Mexico, the Conquistadors, would have used rapiers of Toledo steel.
Rapiers were mainly a "fashion accessory" which is one reason they were so widespread. They could be used in warfare, but were remarkably fragile. even the Conquistadores used more substantial weapons. The officers, of course, made their own choices. I've heard the test of Toledo swords was to bend the blade until you could thread it through the hilt. If it broke, it was a fake.