Tearing down confederate monuments

Status
Closed
Jan 2016
388
Ohio
#1
Do you think this is right? I don't and let me explain why. When I look at these statues I don't see slavery, I see history of our great country. I see how far we have come. If we tear down these monuments, then we might as well tear down every monument of George Washington and some of our founding fathers who ALSO were slave owners. I find it extremely hypocritical. What about monuments of Roosevelt who forced the Japs out of their homes and made them live in camps for the duration of WW2 because they were the same ethnicity. What are your thoughts? I'm not saying its right or wrong, but people picking and choosing and specifically targeting certain parts in our history is exactly what keeps problems like racial diversity alive. If you tear down confederate monuments, then tear down EVERY monument that shows someone who wants on the wrong side of racial equality
 
Mar 2017
3,238
United States
#2
I am in full agreement with you. Those SJW types are nothing but a cancer plaguing our great Republic. The Confederate monuments were built in honor of our ancestors, most of whom were morally upright and God-fearing men who fought against what they believed to be an attack by a tyrannical federal government against sovereign states as defined by the Constitution. The people who desecrate the monuments of our forefathers are despicable cretins who should be given a lengthy prison sentence.
 
Last edited:
Jul 2017
182
USA
#3
Do you think this is right? I don't and let me explain why. When I look at these statues I don't see slavery, I see history of our great country. I see how far we have come. If we tear down these monuments, then we might as well tear down every monument of George Washington and some of our founding fathers who ALSO were slave owners. I find it extremely hypocritical. What about monuments of Roosevelt who forced the Japs out of their homes and made them live in camps for the duration of WW2 because they were the same ethnicity. What are your thoughts? I'm not saying its right or wrong, but people picking and choosing and specifically targeting certain parts in our history is exactly what keeps problems like racial diversity alive. If you tear down confederate monuments, then tear down EVERY monument that shows someone who wants on the wrong side of racial equality
You might as well say the same about Nazi flags. "Uhhhh its just history bruh, its not about genocide"

No one waves around George Washingtons face when they shoot 9 unarmed black people IN CHURCH
 
Last edited:
Sep 2010
558
#4
You might as well say the same about Nazi flags. "Uhhhh its just history bruh, its not about genocide"

No one waves around George Washingtons face when they shoot 9 unarmed black people IN CHURCH
typical liberal showing your stupidity you don't even know what the cival war was about just what the liberal media tells you
 

Pedro

Forum Staff
Mar 2008
17,151
On a mountain top in Costa Rica. yeah...I win!!
#5
NOTE: This thread has been moved to the chamber. Proceed with care. Stricter rules apply here.
Thank you.
 

Lucius

Forum Staff
Jan 2007
16,363
Nebraska
#6
If none of the states had slavery, or, if all of them had slavery, there would have been no war.

So.

The war was about slavery.
 

Baltis

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
4,005
Texas
#7
A southern historian with disappointed friends:

Marie,
Take heart my friend. Your nation’s history did not change. As it turns out, history is far more resilient than you imagined. In truth, the very history that you cling to, may not be any more complete than the narrative now being circulated. The Gone with the Wind image of antebellum America with ladies dressed in colorful hoop skirts being escorted by gentlemen who address the servants with courtesy and respect, the image of negro slaves, happy with their lot in life and singing joyous hymns while working in the fields. Or, we also have the dark image of men with whips laying the lash repeatedly on skin already scarred by past beatings, who laugh and make jokes about breeding up the women while selling their husbands off to new owners in far off lands. Which of these images is true?

We grew up with the first. School teachers steeped in Lost Cause theory who repeatedly describe the southern gentlemen as protectors of their known society, loyal to their state, Christians to the core, yet unable to attain victory in the face of impossible odds stacked against them. Of noble causes such as state’s rights and secession, little talk of slavery or the darker side of southern society. We were taught to revere men like the gallant John Pelham, J E B Stuart, and that one general with unlimited talent and beloved by all, Robert E. Lee. Our teachers almost had to spit when faced with names such as William Tecumseh Sherman or Ulysses S. Grant. We grew up in the era of school busing, when feelings against black people ran high, lots of scared kids were sent to our schools, and lots of white folks created new private schools, like the one we graduated from. We were the ‘rebels’.

But there is another narrative alive today. Probably just as biased as lost cause theory yet also quite true in its own way. A story of oppression, where the evil white owners were willing to commit treason in order to keep the black man enslaved. The southern plantation owners were all Simon Legree and the slaves were all Kunta Kinte. The slaves worked from pre-dawn to dark all the while foremen constantly cracked a whip overhead to keep them busy. The women spending their nights in fear, lest the white men visit for a quick round of unwanted sex. A life devoid of joy.

I must admit to being a bit shocked by the second narrative. I rejected it at first but then took the time to study the matter. I looked at Lost Cause theory and how it drove southern society for a hundred years after the Civil War. I looked at pre-war documentation and saw the differences. It was very difficult for me to view the southerners as anything short of heroes, Stone Mountain was completed when I was but 13.

As time passed and I considered things further, I came to understand that my complete rejection of the 2nd narrative was wrong. Preconceived notions die hard and it has been difficult to come to grips with the idea my perception needed work. And now the Confederate flag and monument debates hit the public. I think I understand why southern society is in such a state of rejection. ‘We know our history. We were taught it in schools and this new narrative is not correct!!!!! ‘

But that is actually hot thinking. Not at all what the situation calls for. Cool reflection is in order here, complete with understanding that our high school teachers did us no favors. Of course they were also victims of the Lost Cause, having grown up in the 40s and 50s. Boy, this is tough stuff. It sometimes feels like an all out assault upon the south and southern society. But it isn’t. The 2nd narrative is just another perspective, with different emphasis. Much of that emphasis is needed to help us understand the rifts and see each other’s point of view. Regardless of which perspective one starts with, the greater understanding of history will come from an ability to view all sides of the war, from all participants.

The Civil War was about slavery. We just need to accept that fact and move forward. It doesn’t mean that all southerners were evil people, people are complex and capable of many things. It doesn’t mean that history has changed, the war was still fought by the same people and still comes out the same way. It means our understanding of that war has changed, our perspective changed, not the events themselves. After all, do the statues represent history or do they represent the false narrative? In my opinion, history has not changed and will remain quite resilient. So much so, in fact, that 100 years of teachers hammering at Lost Cause Theory did not manage to change it. Removing the statues will not change history, just as placing the statues did not change history. However, the debate might very well impact your perspective and open your eyes to some additional history. In fact, the debate itself and the events it has inspired are themselves history.
 
May 2013
395
Hays Kansas (ex Australian)
#8
Do you think this is right? I don't and let me explain why. When I look at these statues I don't see slavery, I see history of our great country. I see how far we have come. If we tear down these monuments, then we might as well tear down every monument of George Washington and some of our founding fathers who ALSO were slave owners. I find it extremely hypocritical. What about monuments of Roosevelt who forced the Japs out of their homes and made them live in camps for the duration of WW2 because they were the same ethnicity. What are your thoughts? I'm not saying its right or wrong, but people picking and choosing and specifically targeting certain parts in our history is exactly what keeps problems like racial diversity alive. If you tear down confederate monuments, then tear down EVERY monument that shows someone who wants on the wrong side of racial equality
Well the thing is the statues are not being torn down. They are being removed to more appropriate places such as museums, and in at least one case a Confederate war cemetery.

And be also aware many of these statues were raised generations after the original events that inspired them. For example the Robert E Lee statue that caused so much conflict in Charlottvile was only installed in 1927, by a private citizen.

Moral positions of a society will change over time, and we need to respect that. But if these statues were to be destroyed and the history expunged, then unfortunately I would see myself being very conflicted over the issue
 

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,074
#9
They are just statues. personally I don't care that much either way. I think it's important to remember and understand the history.

If a society through it's democratic processes chooses to remove a statue then thats their collective call.
 
Status
Closed