The Alamo - 6 March 1836

Baltis

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
4,005
Texas
Slavery was generally profitable in moist and wet East Texas and not so much in the rest of Texas. Southern planters were interested in East Texas lands. The problem for Mexico and for the Spaniards before them, was that very few Mexicans were interested in settling in Texas. The Comanche were potent, marauding natives who were quite successful in fending off settlers. They roamed far south and deeply into Mexico. The Mexican government wanted the Americans to settle the land and to serve as buffers between themselves the Comanche and Apaches. This was only partially successful.

Texas, at the time of the Texas Revolution was mostly empty. I doubt there were more than 40-50,000 people in the whole area of Texas at the time, which, if you understand the geography of the place, was like a drop n the ocean.

San Antonio, where the Alamo is located in the heart of downtown, was the only real city in Texas at the same. The remaining settlements were just tiny by comparison. San Antonio is where six outstanding Spanish Colonial Missions are located. Some of these missions were originally located on the banks of the Mississippi to keep the French out, but they were difficult to sustain and eventually pulled back to San Antonio.

The Mexican government turned the other cheek towards settlers who brought slaves with them, and turned the other cheek when it came to the settlers' de facto refusal to convert to Catholicism. Culturally, the American settlers were not on the same page as either the Spanish or the Mexicans and eventually this fact made the Mexicans nervous. They had reason to be.
Early TX history has some other unfortunate ties to slavery. The famous pirate Jean Lafitte and his brother operated an illegal slave trade along the upper gulf coast. As importing slaves to the US had become illegal, they developed a system of landing in Galveston Bay before later sale to owners in Louisiana and Mississippi. While commonly referred to as a Pirate, Jean Lafitte did not really do much of that high seas robbery stuff. He was mostly an onshore slave trader.

Yes, slavery was mostly an east TX thing. Primarily because settlers from the US were mostly an east TX thing. It is correct to point out that the settlement line for settlers from the US was not really further than Temple or Waco and then down the Brazos. There were a few 'Coloradoans' but they were really stretched thin.

During the Mexican rule, slavery in TX was a legal sham. Something about signing a lifetime contract in lieu of being owned.
 

Baltis

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
4,005
Texas
Some of the fighters at the Alamo were fairly unsavory free-booters and filibusters looking for adventure, land and war. Crockett and his bunch could be counted in this group. The rest were more normal settlers who brought their wives and children into the compound with them. There were a few slaves as well.
I was under the impression that during the time period between the first battle of San Antonio and the Alamo siege, almost all of the Texians had gone home and the garrison was almost all volunteer companies like the New Orleans Greys. Filibusterers in search of adventure and easy conquest. I don't really know how many of each made up the final numbers. Or how many of each group were among the dead at Goliad. It would be an interesting tidbit.

New Orleans Greys
Alabama Red Rovers
Kentucky Mustangs
Georgia
Mississippi

Somebody was the 'Rattlers' but I can't remember which one group is was.

Did Crockett's group have a name for themselves?
 
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Baltis

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
4,005
Texas
This is from wiki:

Twenty-three Greys fought and died at the Battle of the Alamo, one died at the Siege of Béxar, twenty-one were lost in the Goliad Campaign, and seven Greys served at the Battle of San Jacinto.

https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/qjn02
I see a reference to the Mobile Greys and the San Antonio Greys in the TSHA article. It strikes a memory chord in me to suggest that Alabama had actually been the home to two different groups. The Red Rovers may have come from North Alabama, near Florence or Muscle Shoals.
 
Dec 2011
2,988
Late Cretaceous
I had a look at a couple of Osprey Books last night, and found a little bit more information.

The Alabama Red Rovers was a unit about 61 strong, from around Courtland, Alabama, raised and commanded by Dr John Shackleford.
The womenfolk of Courtland made hunting shirts of "linsey woolsey", fringed at the sleeves and shoulders and dyed red, hence the name. Muskets, cartridge cases, canteens and blankets were supplied by the Alabama State Arsenal.
The Rovers were attached to the Lafayette Battalion of Fannin's command and most died at La Bahia. Dr Shackleford was spared to doctor the Mexican wounded, though his son was one of those shot.An experience which another doctor, JH Barnard described as having aged Shackleford by 10 years.

The Kentucky Mustangs came from Bardstown, KY, and were led by Captain Burr H Duval. Like the Rovers, they were incorporated into the Lafayette Battalion and shared their fate.

Link to Dr Shackleton's account of Goliad:
Survivor Capt. Jack Shackelford's Account of the Goliad Massacre

Ward's Battalion mentioned at the beginning, were the Georgia Volunteers, who were captured after a firefight at Refugio, and executed by General Urrea's troops on the 16th March along with those of Captain King.
 
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royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,582
San Antonio, Tx
I wrote "These absolutely desinterest to question the own history, the own behaviour "

Correct seems to be "These absolute disinterest to question the own history, the own behaviour "

I am sorry I was writing it wrong, but that a native english speaker is not able to get the meaning of my sentence is hard to believe.
Beorna, this is rather strange. Neither sentence makes any sense to me.
 

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