The Alamo - 6 March 1836

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,582
San Antonio, Tx
Here is a nice Alamo thread. TJ has some really nice pics and diagrams in the first two lines of this thread. There used to be more but some of the links got canceled. Anyway, what would the TX contingent do without an annual review of the Alamo?

:)

Geez! The Texas flag did not yet exist; the Alamo did NOT have that curved facade. Total BS!
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,582
San Antonio, Tx
Just read an account by Paco Ignacio Taibo II

[ame="[URL]http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/6070709268/ref=oh_details_o09_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1[/URL]"]El Alamo: Una Historia No Apta Para Hollywood = The Alamo: Amazon.co.uk: Paco Ignacio, II Taibo: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Aqf8YKZuL.@@AMEPARAM@@51Aqf8YKZuL[/ame]

He obviously has a big agenda to de-bunk myths, but when you look at all his evidence, there's been so much rubbish written and 'recollections' (many years later), all conflicting etc, that it's difficult to know where to start from the old 'legend'

A few pointers though, from his book:
1) Slavery was illegal in Mexico, some folk were fighting so it would be allowed
2) Not many of the 'Texan' heroes had a lot to do with Texas, many had moved south to join in a sort of land grab from Mexico
3) Most people involved on both sides seemed to be immoral, incompetant or both, especially Santa Anna who turned an easy victory into a colossal defeat at San Jacinto by sheer idiocy.
4)The Alamo doesn't seem too relevant to what happened at San Jacinto. After the Alamo things could have gone either way, luckily Santa Anna was utterly useless.
Santa Ana dithered for 13 days in San Antonio before finally buckling down and attacking the Alamo. There may have been logistical reasons for him to spend that time in San Antonio, but it is clear that those 13 days were quite useful to Sam Houston whose ragtag “army” was in serious need of remedial training.

No one really expected theAlamo defenders to stay put. I think those who knew about the vastly outnumbered Alamo garrison - most were from out of the province - expected Travis to leave. To this day I have never found a clear reason as to why they stayed, but stay they did. Travis had a rather “spotty” history back home having to do with a wife he had apparently left in the lurch (not sure where that was).

Over the centuries, the biographies of the Alamo defenders - most of whom weren’t from Texas - have been sliced and diced to the point that few know what the exact truth is about them, but it is quite clear to me that they were not saints, some were fleeing obligations ‘back home’, and some wondered just what in hell they had gotten themselves into. Later, after the Alamo, the American settlers took up arms when it became clear that Santa Ana was interested in doing a little ethnic cleansing of his own. The ‘army’ he met at San Jacinto was mostly - not all - a Texian army because by that time, the settlers knew they were Santa Ana’s real target.

In any case, the battle of San Jacinto was over and done with in about 15 minutes. It was not Santa Ana’s best moment.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,582
San Antonio, Tx
And zillions of businesses named Alamo—Alamo Airport, Alamo Barber Shop, Alamo Car Wash, Alamo Drug Store etc (thanks to John Waters). And on the South Side along the river where the functioning missions are there are many businesses named Mission.
Hm. Where is the “Alamo airport”?
 

Baltis

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
4,005
Texas
Santa Ana dithered for 13 days in San Antonio before finally buckling down and attacking the Alamo. There may have been logistical reasons for him to spend that time in San Antonio, but it is clear that those 13 days were quite useful to Sam Houston whose ragtag “army” was in serious need of remedial training.

No one really expected theAlamo defenders to stay put. I think those who knew about the vastly outnumbered Alamo garrison - most were from out of the province - expected Travis to leave. To this day I have never found a clear reason as to why they stayed, but stay they did. Travis had a rather “spotty” history back home having to do with a wife he had apparently left in the lurch (not sure where that was).

Over the centuries, the biographies of the Alamo defenders - most of whom weren’t from Texas - have been sliced and diced to the point that few know what the exact truth is about them, but it is quite clear to me that they were not saints, some were fleeing obligations ‘back home’, and some wondered just what in hell they had gotten themselves into. Later, after the Alamo, the American settlers took up arms when it became clear that Santa Ana was interested in doing a little ethnic cleansing of his own. The ‘army’ he met at San Jacinto was mostly - not all - a Texian army because by that time, the settlers knew they were Santa Ana’s real target.

In any case, the battle of San Jacinto was over and done with in about 15 minutes. It was not Santa Ana’s best moment.
So true about the biographies of Alamo defenders. the mythology is somewhat incredible. Including that about Sam Houston and the idea of him needing time to train his army. It has been a long time but I think the actual timeline for Sam Houston suggests that he was busy arguing about who was in command and who was going to be the boss and not doing much training or recruiting. I will look into it while looking at the TV in a bit and see what I can find.
 

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