The Alamo - 6 March 1836

diddyriddick

Historum Emeritas
May 2009
14,692
A tiny hamlet in the Carolina Sandhills
#32
Corto Maltese,

The fascination with the Alamo isn't about who won or lost. That was a given. What makes the Alamo so inspiring was that 180 men died defending what they believed in against the overwhelming numerical superiority of Santa Ana. It's about courage. It's about honor. And it's about the inspiration that those 180 men gave their successors at San Jacinto. In short, it's about everything that Texans aspire to be.

You wouldn't understand.
 

tjadams

Ad Honoris
Mar 2009
25,362
Texas
#33
Mexico won the battle of the Alamo this is a fact. You may not like it you may act like a child when sombody tells you. But it was a Mexican victory
.. this is a historical fact....and this is a history board where we speak of what actualy happend and not what we wish happend...and i don`t see what Norway has to do in this thread. But i gues it is better to attack Norway than to say that Mexico did win the battle of the alamo.....
Your intent is one thing, the perception is another. Either you're flat out jealous or you
just don't get it as Diddy wrote, so don't attempt to hide behind a veil of calling for
Historical accuracy when you didn't have to visit this thread.

The Mexican pyrrhic victory at the Alamo is a fact. But the sacrifice of the men at the
Alamo, paying the ultimate price for their cause, was a victory for the Texas Revolution.
Much like Thomas Paine's "Common Sense" for the American Revolution, the Alamo and
subsequent Goliad (Fort Defiance) loss to the Mexican Army, served as a propaganda victory for the rebels.
By equal comparison, the Battle of Thermopylae, a slaughter of so few against so many,
should be barely mentioned in History by your reasoning.

The American defeat at Pearl Harbor was a Japanese victory, that is a fact.
The US surrender after the Battle of Bataan, and the 15,000 US soldiers who fought
and suffered in the Death March, was a Japanese victory, that is a fact.

Those horrific defeats are statistically correct, they were defeats, but we can celebrate the
heroic, valour and determination in our losses in a larger picture with the final outcome.
Every setback is a setup for a comeback.
 

beorna

Ad Honoris
Jan 2010
17,473
-
#34
When I was reading the thread, I, supposely like Corto, thought as well that here is a lot of gushing praise. I would like to know, how the Texas revolution is teached in the US or especially in Texas itself. As far as I know did the mexican Republic grant settlers from the USA to settle within the borders of Mexico and even granted special rights to these settlers. When the number of immigrants became too big, further immigration was abolished and e.g. the right of free taxes collected. A further main point for further struggle was, that mexico prohibited the slavery. so the Texas revolution is an uprise of a slavery-supporting immigrants against the legitimate government of mexico. I suppose, that is not what you get tought, isn't it?
 
Aug 2011
7,045
Texas
#35
When I was reading the thread, I, supposely like Corto, thought as well that here is a lot of gushing praise. I would like to know, how the Texas revolution is teached in the US or especially in Texas itself. As far as I know did the mexican Republic grant settlers from the USA to settle within the borders of Mexico and even granted special rights to these settlers. When the number of immigrants became too big, further immigration was abolished and e.g. the right of free taxes collected. A further main point for further struggle was, that mexico prohibited the slavery. so the Texas revolution is an uprise of a slavery-supporting immigrants against the legitimate government of mexico. I suppose, that is not what you get tought, isn't it?
Oh good grief, not again! Yes, we... or at least from what i remember from my school day's, were taught our history as it really was. Just a little friendly advice, "Don't mess with Texas!"
 
Aug 2011
7,045
Texas
#37
Is it forbidden to ask questions? If you think I am wrong, you have the chance to tell me your version.
No it is not verboten, and you didn't ask a direct question, you came into the thread with a supposition, or probably more correctly a presumption.

Anyways, you already know the story, as you would say, better than i or other Texans do, so no sense in repeating it, right? Besides, It would just get bogged down in a bunch of nonsense and speaking over each other like a previous thread, so why go there? This is our remembrance and our culture. Please respect it like i greatly respect yours and others.
 

Baltis

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
4,003
Texas
#38
Is it forbidden to ask questions? If you think I am wrong, you have the chance to tell me your version.
Not to worry Mr. beorna, honest historians here acknowledge the truth behind your words. We are aware that our past contains the whole of human conduct, both good and ugly. Hopefully, we learn from the example of slavery by acknowledging its existence and moving forward. The struggle for racial equality even continues to this day. It was less than 4 years ago the Civil Rights Era got a big old exclamation point as the nation elected its first black president. We hope the lessons of our past can be of assistance for other nations as well. As I understand it, Germany also continues to struggle with issues of race?

As to expansion of the US and the forms it took during the first half of the 19th century, well, that is the way things went. Our people had a history of thinking that, once they are the majority, they get to declare independence and do their own thing. I will also say the Mexican War was a big old landgrab. I guess it just goes to show, if a nation doesn't populate and use its territory, others will tend to occupy it for them.

At the time this was going on, Mexican populations in CA, NM, and TX were extremely small even if fairly longstanding. They could not even be said to control the territory with regard to their Indian neighbors. Yes, that made them weak to the desires of a growing nation. Yes, we did that. No, I'm not advocating giving any of it back. Instead, I am simply going to continue to enjoy the Alamo, the Mexican War, and the rest of my nation's very colorful past.
 
Feb 2012
608
Indiana
#39
I haven't been on the forum here for very long, but just going by my time spent on other forums I know that when anyone, regardless of were they're posting from, reaches out and delivers a gratuitous smack at something, they are opening themselves up to a rebuke of some kind, however mild or strong that response might be. There are ways to present an opinion without being offensive. And this of course is just my opinion.

Lee
 

beorna

Ad Honoris
Jan 2010
17,473
-
#40
No it is not verboten, and you didn't ask a direct question, you came into the thread with a supposition, or probably more correctly a presumption.

Anyways, you already know the story, as you would say, better than i or other Texans do, so no sense in repeating it, right? Besides, It would just get bogged down in a bunch of nonsense and speaking over each other like a previous thread, so why go there? This is our remembrance and our culture. Please respect it like i greatly respect yours and others.
Well, you may of course rember your history the way you like. If my short summary is correct, then I just ask myself, why you celebrate this. that's as if we would celebrate the sedan-day or the 1st of september.
 

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