The Austrian Succession War (1740-1748)

Dec 2016
123
Spain
I am happy because I am about to finish reading this book:

The War of the Austrian Succession. Reed S. Browning. St. Martin's Griffin (1995)


However it was a really tough reading. I feel is a complex but very complete accounting about The Austrian Succession War, but the author didn't introduce characters that I would have appreciated because I am missing lots of details and as a result I missed some context. Of course I did know about King George II, Cumberland, Frederick The Great, Maria Theresa of Austria, Maurice de Saxe, Don Philip V, but I have to research by myself about Lowendal, Charles Emmanuel, Campo-Florido, Francis Stephen, Lobkowitz, etc. just to give you some examples. Fortunately, Browning has an ending chapter (where I am right now, just 6 pages to finish the entire book!) when summarizes the theaters of this war: Germany, Italy and Low Countries and give some conclussions about the land and naval supremacy of European powers engaged in this war. However, I feel overwhelmed trying to understand lots of events, is certainly that my english leaves too much to desire but in this case language was not my main concern. In the last chapters I was about to die with the overwhelming diplomatic relations and negotiations, diplomats and politicians engaged with no idea about the background of any of them (Saint-Severin to give an example).

For those reasons if you know about websites or videos that can give me some support to my reading I would appreciate it. I have lots of questions, besides the characters, to give some examples:

1- What was the role of Russia in this War? At the end of the War, about 1747, Great Britain came to an agreement to ask Russia for support for the campaign against France in the Low Countries, but what happened? Did this agreement become effective?
2- The first campaign in Germany comprises the Prussian invasion of Austrian's Silesia territory. But what happened with Silesia after Frederick's invasion?
3- What was the extent of the war overseas in America and India? I don't have any clue or idea of what happened in India.
4- The Austrian negotiations with European Powers is quite confusing and is tedious as gave me the impression that Austrians were changing their mind all the time. In one of the ending chapters where I was about to die, I couldn't understand why Austria decided to ally with Great Britain but at the end of the war Austrians suddenly decided to switch to France for future plans. French fought against Austrians in Low Countries and Italy, right? And at the end of the war Austrians decided to ally with French and cut their relations with Great Britain??
5- The alliances are tough to me as well. I am still trying to figure out what is the meaning of "Gallispans" and "Worms allies".

I now need to find an easier historical period, event or war to take it easier...
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,630
Dispargum
In America the war was known as "King George's War"

No, I think you just need a better-written book. If you haven't already figured it out, the second book you read on the same subject is easier, and the third one even easier, etc, because you are already familiar with the topic. If you really want a different war, try the one immediately before or immediately after, ie, the War of Spanish Succession or the Seven Years' War. Again, you will find that you are already familiar with many of the countries, personalities, and issues.
 
Dec 2016
123
Spain
I have books only for the Seven Years War:

The Seven Years War in Europe: 1756-1763 (Modern Wars In Perspective). Franz A.J. Szabo. Routledge.


Frederick the Great and the Seven Years' War, 1756-1763. Herbert J. Redman. McFarland & Company


I will think about which one should I pick to read now.
 

nuclearguy165

Ad Honorem
Nov 2011
4,829
Ohio, USA
I have books only for the Seven Years War:

The Seven Years War in Europe: 1756-1763 (Modern Wars In Perspective). Franz A.J. Szabo. Routledge.


Frederick the Great and the Seven Years' War, 1756-1763. Herbert J. Redman. McFarland & Company


I will think about which one should I pick to read now.
If you haven't read either one of them then I just have one question for you;

Are you a fan of Frederick or not? Franz Szabo takes a real hatchet job to him, and considering the author's background, I wouldn't consider his perspective completely unbiased.