The Balkans of yours

Tsar

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
2,010
Serbia
I'd like to see what comes up to your mind when you read/hear "the Balkans". Where do you draw the borders? Which countries are "balkanic" and which are not? Are the Balkans European? And most importantly, what is the main factor of deciding what's "balkanic" and what's not?

Also, I'd like to use a chance to recommend a book called "Imagining the Balkans" by Maria Todorova. It will make you think.
 
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At Each Kilometer

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
4,128
Bulgaria
The territory took its name from the Balkan Mountains. So it is geographical region and is connected with the mountains mentioned above. Ergo if the mountains is on the land of the state, then the state is balkan one. If it isnt - the state is non-balkan one.

Following the logic above the only Balkan countries are Bulgaria and Serbia and the whole concept of BalkaniZation, a term used a lot here in historum becomes kinda meanlingless :) Balkan is a very beatifull mountain by the way. I personally like it's old name - Hemus. Hemusian penisulla.
 
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Shtajerc

Ad Honorem
Jul 2014
6,743
Lower Styria, Slovenia
Are the Balkans European? Gee, I don't know, are they African? :suspicious:

I go by the belief that Balkans are a peninsula, so everything on it is the Balkan.
For me that includes Croatia, Bosnia, Serbia, Montenegro, Kosovo, Albania, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Romania, Greece and the European part of Turkey. Strictly geographically speaking the Dinaric part of Slovenia is also part of the Balkans, but Slovenia as a whole is not. Some like to think so though - because of Yugoslavia.

Of course, some regions seem more Balkanic to me than others, no doubt. There's a big difference between f. ex. Dalmatia, Kosovo or some flatland.

What is Balkanic? Everything that comes from the Balkans, of course. :)
 
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May 2011
1,221
Europe
Off course the Balkans are European, for me the balkans countries are : Albania, Bosnia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia. Why this countries and not Greece, Bulgaria and Romania ? To be honest I don't know really.
In fact for me the Balkans are mostly the countries of ex-Yugoslavia
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,934
Western Eurasia
geographically as Shtajerc described (i would add that the Slavonian part of Croatia and Vojvodina in Serbia is debatably Balkans). culturaly i associate the term to European territories that were both under Byzantine and then Ottoman influence and in that parts of Romania and even Cyprus can be included (though the later is geographically not even Europe), if i'm not mistaken many Romanians also selfidentify with the Balkans. Basicly Balkans=orthodox and ottoman muslim territories of south-east europe?
 

Isleifson

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,164
Lorraine tudesque
Are the Balkans European? Gee, I don't know, are they African? :suspicious:

I go by the belief that Balkans are a peninsula, so everything on it is the Balkan.
For me that includes Croatia, Bosnia, Serbia, Montenegro, Kosovo, Albania, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Romania, Greece and the European part of Turkey. Strictly geographically speaking the Dinaric part of Slovenia is also part of the Balkans, but Slovenia as a whole is not. Some like to think so though - because of Yugoslavia.

Of course, some regions seem more Balkanic to me than others, no doubt. There's a big difference between f. ex. Dalmatia, Kosovo or some flatland.

What is Balkanic? Everything that comes from the Balkans, of course. :)
Slovenia is not in the Balkans, too much Kraut.:lol:
 
Apr 2014
385
Bulgaria
Not every country located on the Balkan peninsula has the characteristics of Homo Balkanicus. I wouldn't add here Slovenia, in some way Croatia and Transilvania, only what used to be Vlachia. I don't agree with the western 90s' view on Yugoslavia as "the Balkans". What is Balkans to me are the nations who were under Ottoman rule and cultural influence, i.e. mainly Bulgaria, Greece, Serbia, Albania, FYR of Macedonia and hardly Romania. This is the key which makes them a crossroad between East and West and mysterious since 18th century til nowadays. Are they European? In the modern imagination - probably not yet, but they used to be the European center once. It's a great destination for adventurers. Anyway, there is much to be said but what makes the Balkan nations so sweet is that they (we) often argue with each other not realizing how similar they (we) are.
 

Shtajerc

Ad Honorem
Jul 2014
6,743
Lower Styria, Slovenia
Slovenia is not in the Balkans, too much Kraut.:lol:
Of course it's not, mein Gott! :p Since when are the Alps and Panonia considered Balkan, can anyone explain me that? Like I said, the Dinaric region excluded (and even here mostly by geographical definition), Slovenia has not much to do with the Balkans. 70 years in a Balkan country and you're doomed forever. Don't get me wrong, if I was be from the Balkans I would be proud, but I'm not. I get it that this thread is subjective and our opinions differ, so there's no need for me to start a fuss. But since, a picture says more than a 1000 words, here's one to show the difference. The left is a Slovene, the right a Serb, I think.



And how we imagine the whole thing

 
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At Each Kilometer

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
4,128
Bulgaria
These pictograms are quite interesting I admit. I am trying to decipher them at the moment. Could you please at least provide us with some hints in order to understand the meaning of their talk :)
 

Isleifson

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,164
Lorraine tudesque
Of course it's not, mein Gott! :p Since when are the Alps and Panonia considered Balkan, can anyone explain me that? Like I said, the Dinaric region excluded (and even here mostly by geographical definition), Slovenia has not much to do with the Balkans. 70 years in a Balkan country and you're doomed forever. Don't get me wrong, if I was be from the Balkans I would be proud, but I'm not. I get it that this thread is subjective and our opinions differ, so there's no need for me to start a fuss. But since, a picture says more than a 1000 words, here's one to show the difference. The left is a Slovene, the right a Serb, I think.



And how we imagine the whole thing

I did not know that I could understand Serbian so well.:zany: