The battle of Tollense 1200 - 1300 bc Bronze age weapons vs stone age weapons?

Aug 2019
67
Netherlands
If i may believe the video in my opening post, there were 1000 to 1500 casualties and 3 to 5000 combatants estimated. That can't be a robbery of a caravan or convoy anymore in my opinion. The battle took place around a bridge across a river that was in use and maintained already since 500 years before the battle and some combatants came from far so it must have been very important. Maybe some tribe(s) denied access to others and trade suffered. If the estimation would be low, like 3000 people battling, then at least 1500 people per side would have been organised. That's quite a number in those times.
 
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Aug 2018
521
Southern Indiana
If i may believe the video in my opening post, there were 1000 to 1500 casualties and 3 to 5000 combatants estimated. That can't be a robbery of a caravan or convoy anymore in my opinion. The battle took place around a bridge across a river that was in use and maintained already since 500 years before the battle, so it must have been very important. Maybe some tribe(s) denied access to others and trade suffered. If the estimation would be low, like 3000 people battling, then at least 1500 people per side would have been organised. That's quite a number in those times.
Despite the numbers, I still think it could be a caravan. Merchants would have grouped together for traveling. Quite possible that it was an annual event that could have been predicted and planned for by both the caravan and the attackers. The causeway would have been a natural place for an ambush. Perhaps a couple of local tribes joined forces for the attack.
 
Aug 2019
67
Netherlands
Despite the numbers, I still think it could be a caravan. Merchants would have grouped together for traveling. Quite possible that it was an annual event that could have been predicted and planned for by both the caravan and the attackers. The causeway would have been a natural place for an ambush. Perhaps a couple of local tribes joined forces for the attack.
Yes, but in that time whole north germany was marsh land, plenty of places to ambush. Or did the bridge played a factor? If it was a convoy of this size, they would need accomodation and food at the arrival of the destinations for at least 1500 people for a longer period..
 
Aug 2018
563
london
Despite the numbers, I still think it could be a caravan. Merchants would have grouped together for traveling. Quite possible that it was an annual event that could have been predicted and planned for by both the caravan and the attackers. The causeway would have been a natural place for an ambush. Perhaps a couple of local tribes joined forces for the attack.
Around this time in 'temperate europe' large forts were being built and destroyed.. in the Mediterranean you have the 'Trojan war', the destruction of Mycenaean Greece, the Sea Peoples and the general 'Bronze Age collapse'... It seems more likely that Tollense is somehow part of that, rather than just a random raid on a caravan. It's important to note that this battle is a totally extraordinary event in the archaeology of northern europe at this time.
 
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Aug 2019
67
Netherlands
Around this time in 'temperate europe' large forts were being built and destroyed.. in the Mediterranean you have the 'Trojan war', the destruction of Mycenaean Greece, the Sea Peoples and the general 'Bronze Age collapse'... It seems more likely that Tollense is somehow part of that, rather than just a random raid on a caravan. It's important to note that this battle is a totally extraordinary event in the archaeology of northern europe at this time.
Are there any indications of those forts in northern germany or nothern europe? I assume this area was already proto germanic or at least battle axe or funnelbeaker people. The later germanic people didn't live much in big settlements in those area's.
 
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Aug 2018
563
london
This paper looks at some bronze age forts in the vicinity of the Tollense valley. Jungbronze- und früheisenzeitliche Burgwälle in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern The Kratzeburg seems to be the largest. Not much is known about bronze age forts. And sites which may have been bronze age forts were also used and built upon in the iron age and medieval period. So in some cases it's not clear what belongs to which period.

The Hunenburg in northern Germany is a much better researched bronze age fort, with an external settlement/town/village. Hünenburg bei Watenstedt – Wikipedia

'The Troy of the North' Das Troja des Nordens
 
Aug 2019
67
Netherlands
This paper looks at some bronze age forts in the vicinity of the Tollense valley. Jungbronze- und früheisenzeitliche Burgwälle in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern The Kratzeburg seems to be the largest. Not much is known about bronze age forts. And sites which may have been bronze age forts were also used and built upon in the iron age and medieval period. So in some cases it's not clear what belongs to which period.

The Hunenburg in northern Germany is a much better researched bronze age fort, with an external settlement/town/village. Hünenburg bei Watenstedt – Wikipedia

'The Troy of the North' Das Troja des Nordens
Wow i never expected this, interesting.
And much more than i thought. It could be there was much more going on in northern germany during bronze age than in the iron age. I never read about saxon forts etc.
 
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Aug 2019
67
Netherlands
It seems that in south sweden there were vast amounts of tin. So there must have been a lot of travelling to that direction too.
 
Mar 2015
1,450
Yorkshire
It seems that in south sweden there were vast amounts of tin. So there must have been a lot of travelling to that direction too.
The "amber road" was not that far from Tollense. I think people typically underestimate how much was going on.
Actually the Amber road in Bronze age was the Tollense valley, which close to where the battle took place, branched into two to reach the Baltic Coast. Denmark was a choke point in the trade on the West and hence the enormous number of bronze swords and conflict in this area (see early map of sword finds).

Amber is the fossilised resin from the Pine Tree and was and still is washed up on the Baltic coast every year after a good storm. About 4 tonnes per year still comes from this source (it is not mined, BTW). It was highly prized by the Greeks (not so much by the Romans) both for its aethetic look in ornaments\jewellery but also it magic quality of producing static electricity (the word "electron" is derived from the Greek for amber). It was very, very expensive by the time it reached the Mediterranean.
 
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