The best admiral of all the times

Feb 2019
807
Serbia
#2
Drake, if we are both thinking of Francis Drake then no, far from it. Nelson, de Ruyter and Yi Sun-Shin are obviously in the top 3, I would also put Niels Juel in there too. This is my opinion. Another candidate is Alvaro de Bazan. If we are looking at organisational admirals and administrators then Jackie Fisher, Thomas Chochrane and maybe Alfred von Tirpitz.
 

Nemowork

Ad Honorem
Jan 2011
8,445
South of the barcodes
#5
Nelson was a genius but he was working with tools that had taken a generation to build.

Clear winner is Admiral Yi. Stabbed from behind by his own government, building his own ships and weapons by turning refugees into craftsmen, fighting overwhelming odds and winning with minimum casualties then being betrayed by his own leaders and having to do it all over again.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,689
Portugal
#8
Personally I think this kind of questions like who is the better just allow us to expose our biases, pet cats and the areas that we have more knowledge (or capacity to search in the Wikipedia), basically it is a game, like a quiz, so here it goes mine:

Francisco de Almeida (1450-1510), due to the Battle of Diu.

If not it would be Afonso de Albuquerque (1453-1515).
 
Jan 2019
15
Kent, England
#9
The problem with accounts of Yi Sun-Shin is that they are all-too-reminiscent of tales of 'a few hundred' Spaniards bringing down the Aztec and Incan empires, which conveniently ignore the tens of thousands of local allies fighting alongside the invaders. I seriously doubt that Yi's ships could have won any of these battles alone since they were propelled by human muscles, and the oarsmen would have been exhausted after a relatively short time. Most likely Yi's ships were used like the galleasses at Lepanto - each were used to break into the enemy formations while leading a large squadron of conventional ships.
 
#10
The problem with accounts of Yi Sun-Shin is that they are all-too-reminiscent of tales of 'a few hundred' Spaniards bringing down the Aztec and Incan empires, which conveniently ignore the tens of thousands of local allies fighting alongside the invaders. I seriously doubt that Yi's ships could have won any of these battles alone since they were propelled by human muscles, and the oarsmen would have been exhausted after a relatively short time. Most likely Yi's ships were used like the galleasses at Lepanto - each were used to break into the enemy formations while leading a large squadron of conventional ships.
You've actually made a very good point. However, in the same spirit of realistic likelihood (where a few hundred Spaniards brought down both the Aztec and Incan Empires), I don't think that Admiral Yi was ever described as destroying all of the Japanese ships in any particular battles.
 

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