The British civilization

Jan 2018
13
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#1
Good morning kings and queens,

I am looking for this book"British civilization: an introduction" by Jhon Oakland in his 1ST EDITION 1989.

I couldn't find it anywhere on the internet, so please if you have a copy send it to me and I will be grateful.:):):)
 

Lucius

Forum Staff
Jan 2007
16,363
Nebraska
#2
Have you tried the inter-library loan service?

I think every library on the planet participates.

Of course, the down-side is that one may not keep the book.

Just don't make any notes in the margins. : )
 
Jan 2018
13
......
#3
Have you tried the inter-library loan service?

I think every library on the planet participates.

Of course, the down-side is that one may not keep the book.

Just don't make any notes in the margins. : )
Thank you for replying,
I found other versions there, didn't find the one I am looking for.
 

Asherman

Forum Staff
May 2013
3,171
Albuquerque, NM
#5
Go to Abebooks.com on the Internet, and type in the book title, and author's name. Abebooks has a long list of this title in both soft-covers and hard back. The latest edition, the eighth (2017) in hardback. Hardback 1989 editions range from under $20 to over $2000 asked for a 2017 edition. Paper bindings range from under $5 for a used book to over $125 for a new 2011 edition. A first edition of the 2011 version, in paperback is priced at under $15.

Note: Abebooks is an association of book dealers who buy, trade and sell their stocks on the Internet. They give their asking price, and so some are ridiculously inexpensive, while others probably will never find a buyer.

 
Jan 2018
13
......
#6
I'm out of ideas.
Go to Abebooks.com on the Internet, and type in the book title, and author's name. Abebooks has a long list of this title in both soft-covers and hard back. The latest edition, the eighth (2017) in hardback. Hardback 1989 editions range from under $20 to over $2000 asked for a 2017 edition. Paper bindings range from under $5 for a used book to over $125 for a new 2011 edition. A first edition of the 2011 version, in paperback is priced at under $15.

Note: Abebooks is an association of book dealers who buy, trade and sell their stocks on the Internet. They give their asking price, and so some are ridiculously inexpensive, while others probably will never find a buyer.

Thank you gentlemen I appreciate it.
 

Lucius

Forum Staff
Jan 2007
16,363
Nebraska
#7
I sold a few antique books. I asked why their offers were so low.

It's got to do with the fact that a book can sit on the antique store's shelf for years before someone buys it; and that shelf might hold something which would sell more readily, like a sword, a clock, tools, occasional pieces, crap like that
 
Jan 2018
13
......
#8
I sold a few antique books. I asked why their offers were so low.

It's got to do with the fact that a book can sit on the antique store's shelf for years before someone buys it; and that shelf might hold something which would sell more readily, like a sword, a clock, tools, occasional pieces, crap like that

I've never thought about that, thnx for updating :)
 

Asherman

Forum Staff
May 2013
3,171
Albuquerque, NM
#9
Yep. There are basically two marketing theories. First, sell a whole lot of inexpensive items with minimal profit per gross, or sell one or two items for the big bucks. In either case price will depend on what the Market values. If you don't put much value on a paper-clip they can be purchased almost anywhere for little cash, but if you need a paper-clip to shut down a timer on a nuclear device, and you are stuck in desert, what would you pay for a paper-clip. If there is a single example of almost anything, it is likely going to be desired by someone, and if they have the doe-ray-me the price will be very high. If you have one rare and desirable baseball card, it may be worth millions. Another card from the same period and original collection might not fetch enough to buy a back scratcher.
 
Jan 2018
13
......
#10
Yep. There are basically two marketing theories. First, sell a whole lot of inexpensive items with minimal profit per gross, or sell one or two items for the big bucks. In either case price will depend on what the Market values. If you don't put much value on a paper-clip they can be purchased almost anywhere for little cash, but if you need a paper-clip to shut down a timer on a nuclear device, and you are stuck in desert, what would you pay for a paper-clip. If there is a single example of almost anything, it is likely going to be desired by someone, and if they have the doe-ray-me the price will be very high. If you have one rare and desirable baseball card, it may be worth millions. Another card from the same period and original collection might not fetch enough to buy a back scratcher.
Thank you for clarifying.