The British never achieved anything of value in their entire history before 1500

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
6,136
Portugal
If we closed everything anyone found offensive, there'd be nothing left on the site.
Unfortunately that is almost true.

But this threads title is clearly unfortunate and the first post doesn’t help with its false premises, to a point that the thread title balances between chauvinism and lack of knowledge.
 
Nov 2017
866
Győr
"It was considered that the earliest text to use a decimal place-value system, including a zero, is the Lokavibhāga, a Jain text on cosmology surviving in a medieval Sanskrit translation of the Prakrit original, which is internally dated to AD 458 (Saka era 380). In this text, śūnya ("void, empty") is also used to refer to zero.[28]"


As for rockets:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Congreve_rocket

Here is an Eastern World Contribution:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerala_School_of_Astronomy_and_Mathematics

"The Kerala School of Astronomy and Mathematics was a school of mathematics and astronomy founded by Madhava of Sangamagrama in Kerala, India, which included among its members: Parameshvara, Neelakanta Somayaji, Jyeshtadeva, Achyuta Pisharati, Melpathur Narayana Bhattathiri and Achyuta Panikkar. The school flourished between the 14th and 16th centuries and the original discoveries of the school seems to have ended with Narayana Bhattathiri (1559–1632). In attempting to solve astronomical problems, the Kerala school independently created a number of important mathematics concepts. Their most important results—series expansion for trigonometric functions—were described in Sanskrit verse in a book by Neelakanta called Tantrasangraha, and again in a commentary on this work, called Tantrasangraha-vakhya, of unknown authorship. The theorems were stated without proof, but proofs for the series for sine, cosine, and inverse tangent were provided a century later in the work Yuktibhasa (c. 1500 – c. 1610), written in Malayalam, by Jyesthadeva, and also in a commentary on Tantrasangraha.[1]

Their work, completed two centuries before the invention of calculus in Europe, provided what is now considered the first example of a power series (apart from geometric series).[2] However, they did not formulate a systematic theory of differentiation and integration, nor is there any direct evidence of their results being transmitted outside Kerala.[3][4][5][6]"
As for rockets, please read it first: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_rockets

As for zero: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/0
Ancient Egypt was the first.

Sorry, but your early modern Eastern examples did not really impact the development of Western science and math in any sense.
 
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Kevinmeath

Ad Honoris
May 2011
14,069
Navan, Ireland
.........
This happened because the Indians followed the Cambridge Board from the UK, which only talked about Western Civilization, and tried to erase the Indian Civilization from the minds of young Indians.
So a British education board was focussed on British History?!

Having worked in British education 'erasing' Indian civilisation from young Indian minds isn't a priority.
 
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Oct 2016
692
On a magic carpet
Does one really need to respond to idiocies of this kind? :zany:
I have never referred to any of your posts as "idiotic", Linschoten. Is this kind of language really necessary? If you'd read the thread you'd have noticed me thanking several posters and accepting that my view of the subject has changed since the OP, in response to the wonderful artistic and historical posts/links/images shared by other members of the forum. For instance, someone posted the Lindisfarne Gospels. Discovering that this amazing work of art was created in the British isles during the time period considered by this thread was something that impressed me a lot.

(A page from it can be seen below)



Instead of throwing a tantrum and calling other people an idiot, perhaps you should consider what value you can add to the thread. I've no doubt there are artistic works that you could have shared, if you'd taken the time to really think about it.

I consider the pre-plague (pre 1348) England much more important country, than the Elisabeth I era England by economic and military sense too. It had stronger military (not navy but field army power) and much larger population (in a comparison with the total contemporary European population)
This is interesting. But why? I thought England at that time (1300s) was ruled by a French-speaking nobility, and French culture largely dominated at that period. To what extent was the country at that period culturally "English"?
 
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SirOrmondeWinter

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
3,556
A recent visit to the museum got me thinking about British history. Walking through the ancient pre-Roman section, there was material about the distant past, the Pleistocene era and the Ice Age, which consisted mostly of a few animal bones as well as a few primitive artifacts of such as stone axes, a few things from the Celts made from Bronze, and depictions of primitive wooden huts where people lived.

Then there was the Roman section, which seemed like a sudden explosion of life, civilisation, art and culture. There was a large collection of artefacts and luxury items, artistic works and signs of a lively culture with a big population.

And then we hit the Dark Ages. Walking out of the Roman section and into the medieval, I was struck by how stark the change was. For the next several hundred years, there is virtually NOTHING at all. Barely even one or two items for whole centuries, and what few items there were, all seemed to be weapons. A few swords and other weapons and a few fragments of armour are all that remains from the Dark Ages. Not a single item of art among them. Nothing whatsoever that gives any indication of any sort of civilisation.

In fact, even once a few civilian items finally start to appear in the late 12th century and only really gets going in the 13th century, the pots, jars and other items are very plain, dull and utilitarian looking objects. There's still nothing resembling art until the 1200s - and even then, the very first item that has some crude artistic merit turns out to be a French import. It is a yellow vase with a blue floral pattern on it, somewhat rustic but at least a semblance of beauty for the first time in over 800 years.

Looking around at the other items in the collection, there is a Syrian bowl with some beauty to it, and a few items of Byzantine jewellery. But even these are imports, made by other cultures and brought to Britain. In fact, looking through the collection, there is not a single item of any artistic value prior to 1500 that was made in Britain. And even when significant numbers of beautiful items finally emerge in the late 1400s and the early 1500s, the time of Henry VIII, these turn out to be Italian, German and Spanish imports!

I propose therefore that, on the basis of the items in the museum collection, Britain had no civilisation at all prior to 1500. The British isles seem to have been a primitive and barbaric backwater, lacking in population and culture and such limited wealth as there was after 1200 seems to have been used to buy in culture from elsewhere, strongly suggesting there wasn't any native culture. Only after 1500 did Britain begin to emerge as a culture of its own and start to make its mark on the world for the first time. In other words, Britain as a distinct culture has only existed for about the last 500 years.

Thoughts?
1. Assize of Clarendon 1166

2. Magna Carta 1215
 
Mar 2018
145
Canada
So a British education board was focussed on British History?!

Having worked in British education 'erasing' Indian civilisation from young Indian minds isn't a priority.
Thank God. However, defending colonialism and downgrading Eastern achievements still seems to be.
 
Mar 2018
145
Canada
As for rockets, please read it first: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_rockets

As for zero: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/0
Ancient Egypt was the first.

Sorry, but your early modern Eastern examples did not really impact the development of Western science and math in any sense.
You are right - western science jumped from Roman Numerals to the decimal system based on someone's dreams.

As for rockets, here is an excerpt from the page that you listed:-

"Iron cased rockets, known as Mysorean rockets, were developed in Kingdom of Mysore by the late 15th century and were later copied by the British. The later models and improvements were known as the Congreve rocket and used in the Napoleonic Wars."

"The Mysore rockets of this period were much more advanced than the British had previously seen, chiefly because of the use of iron tubes for holding the propellant; this enabled higher thrust and longer range for the missile (up to 2 km range)."

In case you didn't know it, Mysore was an Indian state.