The British never achieved anything of value in their entire history before 1500

Mar 2018
145
Canada
It doesn't matter that the user said that you've never been to Europe and he was technically wrong. You were still too young for that to be relevant to the context. You weren't able to distinguish between 14th century buildings and 17th century ones. Speaking languages some Europeans also speak doesn't change anything.
True. But in the last twenty years (I am forty plus) I have travelled to most European countries. I haven't been to Luxembourg, Andorra, Norway and Belarus.

Plus I have studied in the British system, and taken European history courses in university.
 

Offspring

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
7,381
România
True. But in the last twenty years (I am forty plus) I have travelled to most European countries. I haven't been to Luxembourg, Andorra, Norway and Belarus.

Plus I have studied in the British system, and taken European history courses in university.
That actually makes this worse, not better, then:
I was born in Europe.

And I rarely found buildings in Europe (outside of Italy and Greece) that were older than 15th century A.D. The Islamic ruled Spain has some too.

I guess you count Stonehenge as a "historical building"? I am guessing the Vandals, Celts, Vikings, etc built large palaces?
 
Aug 2010
16,031
Welsh Marches
Indeed, how is it possible for an adult to travel in Europe and 'rarely find any building outside Italy and Greece that was older that the 15th Century'? Perhaps by being unable to distinguish architectural styles, and recognize that, say, a medieval Gothic church is in fact medieval? In western Europe there are more buildings from prior to the early modern period still in good repair in use (mainly 10th to 14th centuries) than in any other part of the world. There are towns full of them in England, France, the Low countries, Spain, Portugal, etc. In the English town where I live, there are over 400 listed buildings (i.e. protected as being of historical value), and I reckon that more than a third of them must be partly or wholly medieval. The comment about 'Islamic ruled Spain' having a few is very revealing, as though Spain weren't full of towns with medieval churches and residential buildings which have nothing to do with Islam. I am afraid this is prejudiced ignorance speaking.
 
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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,345
Sydney
.
there is a bit of obfuscation about the statement that "the British never...."
Britannia was Gallo-Roman , then high barbarian , and Christian Gothic
Britannia was an integral part of the European culture at all time ,scholars ,warriors ,Saints and sinners
traveled back and forth , after the conquest , the channel was less a ditch and more of an highway
their dynasties were travelling to both sides
to talk of a British culture is to confuse regional variations of their world views
it's like saying that Setchuan culture produced nothing between the 8th and 9th century
 
Aug 2010
16,031
Welsh Marches
That's very true, we tend to forget nowadays that it was easiest to travel by water in early times. One could add that there was a French-speaking court culture after the Norman conquest, and that the kings of England had domains on the mainland for a long while; so England was in no way cut off from the Continent in that period, and all the less so when one considers that Latin was a lingua franca for the highly educated and for churchmen. Prior to that, the Anglo-Saxons had a highly refined vernacular literature (much of it lost, alas) and a very fine national tradition of craftsmanship fro arms and armour, jewelry, illumination of manuscripts etc.
 
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Bish

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
8,206
Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk.
True. But in the last twenty years (I am forty plus) I have travelled to most European countries. I haven't been to Luxembourg, Andorra, Norway and Belarus.

Plus I have studied in the British system, and taken European history courses in university.
I would agree with Offsprings statement that your resume makes your earlier statement worse if it was not for the fact that Uni education is not the be all and end all. I never went to Uni, so maybe it takes an idiot to se all these buildings that don't exist.
 
Nov 2017
866
Győr
You are right - western science jumped from Roman Numerals to the decimal system based on someone's dreams.

As for rockets, here is an excerpt from the page that you listed:-

"Iron cased rockets, known as Mysorean rockets, were developed in Kingdom of Mysore by the late 15th century and were later copied by the British. The later models and improvements were known as the Congreve rocket and used in the Napoleonic Wars."

"The Mysore rockets of this period were much more advanced than the British had previously seen, chiefly because of the use of iron tubes for holding the propellant; this enabled higher thrust and longer range for the missile (up to 2 km range)."

In case you didn't know it, Mysore was an Indian state.
I don't believe that the British started to use primitive rocket so late as the Napoleonic wars. Most of the primitive rocket appeared in European war theaters in the mid 18th century
 
Aug 2010
16,031
Welsh Marches
The Congreve rockets used by the British in the Napoleonic wars were reverse-engineered from Mysore rockets; the French above all had sometimes used rockets for military purposes in the 18th century, but they were not a weapon of any importance as far as I know. Their use in western Europe goes back to the 15th Century.
 
Nov 2011
8,863
The Dustbin, formerly, Garden of England
I don't believe that the British started to use primitive rocket so late as the Napoleonic wars. Most of the primitive rocket appeared in European war theaters in the mid 18th century
Surprisingly he is correct--the one and only time that he has posted anything that is. Rockets were in use from 15thC in Europe, but had limited range and effectiveness. After the several Mysore campaigns the reports of effectiveness of the Indian rockets got back to England (remember that the EIC was nothing to do with the British Army or Woolwich Arsenal) and Sir William Congreve began experimenting with battery rockets, eventually getting his hands on some Mysorean examples and improving them with a range of models. The rockets were used in the Napoleonic War and the War of 1812, but were not rated highly by the Army except against tribal native or very green troops as they were inferior to existing artillery. The Royal navy found them quite useful for shore bombardment though as they set a lot of things on fire. Britain sold them on to a lot of other countries and they were still being used by South American armies and by Russians in central Asia in the 1850s.
 

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