The contemporary soldier question

Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
2,349
Crows nest
#11
It would of course help if ex servicemen were at the front of the queue for jobs and housing, but since WWII it becomes evident that that is not acceptable as others seem more deserving than those who put on the uniform.
 

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,470
Dispargum
#13
The military 'economy' and the civilian economy run on very different principles and rarely overlap. One of the previous posters mentioned networking. Because of the lack of overlap, it can be difficult for military people to network with civilian employers.

In the private sector, there are many companies that provide the same good or service and these companies compete with each other for the same customers. The military 'economy' is monopolistic. Each good or service is provided by one organization or agency. The military does not teach veterans how to earn customer loyalty through superior customer service. When I was in the military, if I needed something, I went to base supply. If they didn't have it, I was out of luck. As a civilian, if a store doesn't have what I need, I go some place else. If a store repeatedly does not have what I need I stop going there. If someone asks me why, I say that store offers bad service. When the military tries to offer good service they focus on treating customers with courtesy and respect. Solving the customer's problem rarely factors into the definition of good service.

A disproportionate number of veterans end up taking civil service or defense contractor jobs. Veterans can find these jobs comfortable because they have learned paperwork and other government procedures and because there is little need for real customer service in these jobs. The number of veterans who successfully start small businesses is smaller than the civilian population. Because the military doesn't teach the skills necessary to run your own business. Many veteran-owned small businesses just end up catering to the military population.

At one base I where I was stationed, there was a bank owned and run by veterans. This bank had several branches, each one at a different military base. They made no attempt to compete in the civilian economy. The financial products and services this bank offered were far below the quality I could get at any civilian bank. This bank could only stay in business because many veteran customers were more comfortable dealing with other veterans and were uncomfortable dealing with civilian companies. That wasn't the only by veterans-for veterans company where I had that experience. In fact, I've never found a by veterans-for veterans company that was equal to or better than their civilian competition. Because the military just doesn't teach veterans how the civilian economy works.

Another issue with veteran employment in the US the past two decades or so is related to agism. Many companies have come to believe that only young people have good ideas or are able to contribute. According to this thinking, people over forty can't keep up with new technology or are stuck in old ways of doing things. Since retiring veterans are by definition at or near age 40, this agism can be an obstacle to transitioning veterans.
 
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Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
2,349
Crows nest
#14
Another issue with veteran employment in the US the past two decades or so is related to agism. Many companies have come to believe that only young people have good ideas or are able to contribute. According to this thinking, people over forty can't keep up with new technology or are stuck in old ways of doing things. Since retiring veterans are by definition at or near age 40, this agism can be an obstacle to transitioning veterans.
That is a very good point, as those in service for longer periods of time, and I'm not talking about those going on to become generals and then retiring from working life anyway, are usually retiring somewhere in their mid thirties to mid forties, some a bit older. These people are seen as too old by too many companies, and not just too old, but also as potentially inflexible in their thinking. This of course is wrong, but unfortunately that's how it is all to often.
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
24,938
Lago Maggiore, Italy
#15
That is a very good point, as those in service for longer periods of time, and I'm not talking about those going on to become generals and then retiring from working life anyway, are usually retiring somewhere in their mid thirties to mid forties, some a bit older. These people are seen as too old by too many companies, and not just too old, but also as potentially inflexible in their thinking. This of course is wrong, but unfortunately that's how it is all to often.
Let's make it pragmatic.

Some coworkers of mine served in the Alpine Corp [here that's not rare!] when military service was compulsory. Anyway ... despite the short time [it was about 1 year], serving in the Alpine Corp one got a driving license for heavy trucks and special vehicles, the other learned to play the trumpet [and today he plays in the band of his municipality].

Traditionally Italian Army thinks to what its soldiers will do after leaving the ranks. But, on the other hand, traditionally Italian Army doesn't fight.

What I can think is that probably our Army has got time and resources to dedicate to the future of its soldiers, while an Army busy with wars and military actions tends to consider less important the personnel.
 

M9Powell

Ad Honorem
Oct 2014
4,308
appalacian Mtns
#16
In the U.S. Veterans, not all soldiers just Combat Veterans are given preference for govt jobs. I myself have a state job driving felony juveniles too detention, court, doctor appointments, head shrinkers & placements. If we are injured in the line of duty we get a nice compensation package, but the red tape too apply can be overwhelming & the VA uses some funky math too pay you. The reason soo many Vets are homeless is because they get kicked out of places the VA puts them, mostly for smoking & drinking. It's rather ridiculous since almost all Vets smoke & drink. They need too find more Vet friendly places too put them, but smoking & drinking are not tolerated well in a civilian run politically correct agency.
 
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VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,281
Brassicaland
#17
In the U.S. Veterans, not all soldiers just Combat Veterans are given preference for govt jobs. I myself have a state job driving felony juveniles too detention, court, doctor appointments, head shrinkers & placements. If we are injured in the line of duty we get a nice compensation package, but the red tape too apply can be overwhelming & the VA uses some funky math too pay you. The reason soo many Vets are homeless is because they get kicked out of places the VA puts them, mostly for smoking & drinking. It's rather ridiculous since almost all Vets smoke & drink. They need too find more Vet friendly places too put them, but smoking & drinking are not tolerated well in a civilian run politically correct agency.
Let's not blame political correctness the intolerance on smoking and drinking; there are practical reasons that there are policies against them.
Both are threats to public safety. In my locality, some apartments and old buildings have been toasted by fires caused by cigarette butts.
I don't mean to discriminate smokers; objectively, smoking is often hazardous to public safety.
Intoxicated people and alcoholism are problematic as well; Cao Cao, one of the warlords during the end of Later Han Dynasty, made an edict that banned public drunkenness.
These two are side issues when we consider the full integration of former soldiers into the civil society.
 

M9Powell

Ad Honorem
Oct 2014
4,308
appalacian Mtns
#18
Let's not blame political correctness the intolerance on smoking and drinking; there are practical reasons that there are policies against them.
Both are threats to public safety. In my locality, some apartments and old buildings have been toasted by fires caused by cigarette butts.
I don't mean to discriminate smokers; objectively, smoking is often hazardous to public safety.
Intoxicated people and alcoholism are problematic as well; Cao Cao, one of the warlords during the end of Later Han Dynasty, made an edict that banned public drunkenness.
These two are side issues when we consider the full integration of former soldiers into the civil society.
Yep, that's exactly the attitude that makes vets homeless. I guess they can smoke & drink under the bridge like a troll.
 

Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
2,349
Crows nest
#19
Public safety, particularly as regards military veterans doing such dangerous activities as smoking and drinking, must be a top priority. If there are not, then there should be "Committees of Public Safety" set up at government and local level. All members of these committees should be vetted to make sure they are all card carry members of the political correctness brigade, be anti-military, self righteous, have suitably joyless and dour faces and certainly no sense of humour.

One day we may get a "Thermidorian Reaction" to all this, but not anytime soon I think.
 

M9Powell

Ad Honorem
Oct 2014
4,308
appalacian Mtns
#20
Public safety, particularly as regards military veterans doing such dangerous activities as smoking and drinking, must be a top priority. If there are not, then there should be "Committees of Public Safety" set up at government and local level. All members of these committees should be vetted to make sure they are all card carry members of the political correctness brigade, be anti-military, self righteous, have suitably joyless and dour faces and certainly no sense of humour.

One day we may get a "Thermidorian Reaction" to all this, but not anytime soon I think.
Sounds like the USSR, but even their vets drink & smoke. Never could stomach that tater liquor they like so well, give me single malt anyday.
 
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